1988 view from what's now the Capital One Arena. Image by Michael Horsley used with permission.

The Washington, DC of the 1980s and '90s was a dramatically different place than the Washington, DC of 2017. The population was shrinking, wealth flowed out to the suburbs, and you could buy a Northwest rowhouse for five figures.

Photographer Michael Horsley documented the era with a fascinating series of 537 photos. You can see his work on Flickr, and through March 4, 2018 in an exhibit at the Historical Society of Washington, DC. Here's a teaser. 

1988 view of the corner of 14th and U NW. Image by Michael Horsley used with permission.

1995 view of what's now the International Spy Museum.  Image by Michael Horsley used with permission.

1987 at 7th and I NW. Image by Michael Horsley used with permission.

1994 on 11th Street between F and E NW.  Image by Michael Horsley used with permission.

Michael's work is part of a Historical Society exhibit titled For the Record that documents historic DC. See it at the George Washington University Museum, 701 21st Street NW, through March 4.

Dan Malouff is a transportation planner for Arlington and professor of geography at George Washington University, but blogs to express personal views. He has a degree in urban planning from the University of Colorado and lives in northeast DC. He runs BeyondDC and contributes to the Washington Post .