District 5 is in light blue on the east side of the county.

All of the candidates running for Montgomery County’s District 5 council seat say they want to bring jobs, shopping, and transit to an area that’s long awaited them. But they seem to disagree on whether that investment should go where it’s most needed, or where there’s the least resistance.

Councilmember Valerie Ervin’s resignation last fall left an open seat in Montgomery County’s District 5, newly redrawn in 2010 to cover a narrow strip from Silver Spring to Burtonsville. Several candidates jumped in to succeed her.

Joining former journalist Evan Glass, who’d already announced before Ervin resigned, are state delegate Tom Hucker, Board of Education member Chris Barclay, community organizer Terrill North, and preacher Jeffrey Thames.



The majority-minority district struggles with poverty and disinvestment, and has some of the county’s highest rates of transit use and lowest rates of car ownership. In ACT’s questionnaire and in public forums, candidates said those issues are why the area needs
more transit and economic development.

Candidates want to build near transit, but some aren’t sure about actual plans


Evan Glass. Photo from the candidate website.


Most candidates say they support building near transit, notably in downtown Silver Spring, home to the one of the region’s largest transit hubs. Glass, who lived in downtown Silver Spring until 2012 and helped start the South Silver Spring Neighborhood Association, supports more development there as a way to preserve other areas and provide more affordable housing.

He’s also called for reforms that could help local businesses and draw younger residents. Last month, he wrote an op-ed in the Washington Post with restaurant owner Jackie Greenbaum about the need to reform the county’s liquor laws.


Tom Hucker. Photo from the Maryland Assembly.


Other candidates have been reluctant to embrace specific projects that have faced resistance. At a Conservation Montgomery forum last month, Tom Hucker said the council should have never approved the Chelsea Heights development 5 blocks from the Metro station because it required cutting down old-growth trees.

Meanwhile, candidates have endorsed bringing more investment to Burtonsville’s dying village center, 10 miles north. Residents generally support that idea, and State Delegate Eric Luedtke, who lives in Burtonsville, has called on District 5 candidates to start talking about it more.

Candidates have also touted the county’s White Oak Science Gateway plan, which envisions a new research and technology hub surrounding the Food and Drug Administration headquarters alongside a town center containing shops and restaurants. The White Oak plan has considerable community support, but is tied up due to concerns about car traffic.

"If we don’t build it in White Oak,” said Hucker at a candidates forum in Briggs Chaney last week, “those jobs are going to go to Konterra [in Prince George’s County], they’re going to go to Howard County, they’re going to go to DC.”

Backtracking on transit

At the core of the White Oak plan are three planned Bus Rapid Transit corridors, on Randolph Road, New Hampshire Avenue, and Route 29, which the county will start studying in detail soon. All of the candidates say they support BRT, and Glass has been vocal about giving buses their own lanes, even if it means repurposing general traffic lanes. “Efficient and timely travel can only be achieved through dedicated lanes,” he wrote in his questionnaire.

But others have offered reservations, especially in Four Corners, where a small group of neighbors have fought it for years. Hucker says he supports BRT “in certain places where it makes sense,” and wants to focus in fixing Ride On first. “I don’t support building BRT on the backs of our current Ride On or Metrobus,” he said at a recent forum in Four Corners.


Terrill North. Photo from the candidate website.


Terrill North wants BRT on New Hampshire Avenue and on Route 29 north of White Oak, but not on Route 29 in Four Corners, which would be the most direct route to Silver Spring. “I don’t think we need to take away curbs or take away business from this community, take away business from this community, take away lanes, because I think that could make things worse,” he said at the same forum.

Likewise, all five candidates have endorsed the Purple Line, which could break ground next year. Hucker has long supported the light-rail line between Montgomery and Prince George’s counties, and represents the General Assembly on Purple Line Now!‘s board.


Chris Barclay. Photo from the candidate website.


Meanwhile, North and Chris Barclay have expressed reluctance about developing around future Purple Line stations, like in Long Branch, citing concerns about higher density and the potential impacts to affordable housing and small businesses.

Strong support for complete streets

With a state highway as its spine, District 5 can be a dangerous place for a pedestrian, with lots of busy road crossings and fast-moving traffic. All candidates have said they support making our streets safer for pedestrians, cyclists, and transit riders.


Jeffrey Thames. Photo from the candidate website.


At the Four Corners forum and other events, Jeffrey Thames said he’d like to see more Barnes Dance intersections, like the one at 7th and H streets NW in the District, where pedestrians can cross in all directions. When asked if they’d support pedestrian- and bicyclist-friendly streets even if it slowed drivers down, Glass, Hucker, and North all said yes.

After years of watching the rest of Montgomery County draw jobs and investment, it seems like it might finally be East County’s turn. Whoever represents the area next will get the chance to determine whether the area can give its residents, especially those of limited means, the investment they want, or if it continues to be a pass-through on the way to other destinations.

Full disclosure: Dan Reed is a member of One Montgomery, an organization that has endorsed Evan Glass, and has contributed to Glass’s campaign.