People who testify at long public hearings or write letters aren’t the only ones with opinions about important planning issues. A lot of conversation happens online, on Twitter and blogs, but commissions that make decisions often don’t see or consider this kind of public opinion. How can the old, formal processes mesh with new ways of communicating?

Last summer, the National Capital Planning Commission and the DC Office of Planning analyzed the District’s height limits in a report requested by Congress. Residents joined in a spirited conversation, not only about the shape and form of the nation’s capital, but also about the future of our city.

District residents, local stakeholders, and citizens across the nation voiced strong opinions on both sides of the issue. I was responsible for designing NCPC’s process for engaging with residents and stakeholders, and reviewing their feedback. I found a big divide between those who participated online versus in person.

Those who attended public meetings, submitted letters, or delivered testimony generally opposed changes to the federal law. Meanwhile, those who spoke up on social media like Twitter and blogs such as this one were more open to exploring opportunities for strategic changes.

However, at the end of the day, only comments we received through the NCPC website or in person at hearings could shape our work as planners and be passed along to members of the Commission to inform their decisions. The people who spoke up online, other than through the project’s website, weren’t part of the formal process and didn’t get the same weight.

Feedback on building height is just one example of how new methods of communication are revolutionizing how people engage with plans and projects. How can planners better respond to and incorporate all the public’s opinions? What we can do to make it easier for you to get your opinions in the places where it will count? 

Discuss this online or in person on April 9


Image from NCPC.

We will discuss this issue further at a panel on April 9, “Talk vs. Action: Making Your Opinion Count” at NCPC’s offices, 401 9th Street NW, Suite 500. I will moderate a discussion about how new forms of communication and public engagement are trans­forming the public process and decision-making.

Greater Greater Washington’s David Alpert is on the panel, as are Cheryl Cort of the Coalition for Smarter Growth, Don Edwards of Justice and Sustainability Associates, and NBC4 reporter Tom Sherwood.

We will talk about questions like:

  • How can public agencies and other organizations reach out to bridge the communication gap?
  • Should online commenters be encouraged to use traditional, tested approaches?
  • Should organizations formally consider feedback presented through informal channels?
  • Are there new or better ways to foster conversations amongst these different audiences? 


I want this program to reflect you. Send in your thoughts, opinions, and questions by posting them to the comment section below. I will keep an eye on this post and incorporate what you have to say into the program. Also, you can tweet your thoughts to me @NCPCgov, using hashtag #SpeakerSeries.

And, I hope that you will show up to the program.  The NCPC Speaker Series is free and open to the public - just let us know you are coming with an RSVP.

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William Herbig, AICP is a resident of Dupont Circle. He works as an urban planner at the National Capital Planning Commission, and is also a board member of the American Planning Association National Capital Area Chapter. Before arriving in DC, he served as Director of Urban Design at Atlanta’s Midtown Alliance. When he’s not at NCPC you might find him leading bike tours of the National Mall.