Photo by james.thompson on Flickr.

One of the most significant ways to ensure some affordable housing is to provide more housing. It’s not the only way and not sufficient on its own, but the clear connection between housing supply and price appears lost on multiple candidates for the April 23 DC Council at-large special election.

At a Chevy Chase Community Association meeting last week, many candidates affirmed support for affordable housing, according to a report on the Chevy Chase listserv, but then wavered or even outright opposed allowing people to rent out basements, garages, or parts of their homes to create new housing opportunities.

Lorrie Scally wrote:

Patrick Mara said “No” to the rentals because he feared they would result in an overflow of students into already crowded schools.



Meanwhile, according to Scally, “Matthew Frumin expressed his support for ADU rentals in all residential neighborhoods,” while Elissa Silverman said she wants to ensure they don’t impact neighbors much (similar to what she said on Let’s Choose DC).

Yet, Scally said, “The candidates’ presentations gave support to DC education issues and affordable housing for residents.”  Mara has endorsed affordable housing spending in the past; on one of the Let’s Choose questions he actually answered, he said, “I’m certain we can find the millions need to fund libraries and affordable housing initiatives.” He told the DC realtors, “The cultural diversity of DC is at risk if we do not protect and build affordable housing.”

Anita Bonds did not attend the forum.

Adding housing must be a part of the housing strategy

About 1,000 more people move into the District each month than the number who leave. Moreover, the demand to come into DC is even greater than this.

Absent enough new housing, many people who want to come here will rent or buy units in gentrifying neighborhoods where prices are still lower than elsewhere. That raises housing prices in those neighborhoods, hastening the problem of some longtime residents being or feeling priced out, and others deciding to take a windfall and sell their houses at a big profit.

If we want longtime residents to stay, an important element of the equation is to find somewhere else for the people to live who want to come into DC. Basement and garage apartments are one important potential source. We already have large single-family houses with one or two retirees who aren’t actually using the whole house. Letting them rent the space is a win-win for everyone except for those who want to keep the neighborhood exclusive and underpopulated relative to its 1950 size.

A lot of people in Ward 3 would rather the population growth go somewhere else. A lot of people vote in Ward 3, and several candidates are clearly seeking their votes. But letting a whole section of the city opt out of growth is not the right policy. It harms poorer neighborhoods by diverting more housing pressure to other areas, hastening gentrification.

How do the candidates stack up?

Four years ago, when I endorsed Patrick Mara, I perhaps assumed too readily that because he lives in a denser neighborhood and bicycles, he also supports a growing city. He might, but he came out strongly against a new matter-of-right building in Chevy Chase, opposes accessory dwellings, and refused to answer either of the two Let’s Choose questions on growth. That’s disappointing and a little surprising for someone who claims to want less government regulation.

I’m also disappointed Elissa Silverman has not been stronger on smart growth. She has less reason to try to pander for votes in Ward 3, when Ward 6 has become the highest-voting ward. Many of Ward 3’s supposedly-liberal residents and newspapers nonetheless seem to go for whomever will lower their own taxes. As a supporter of affordable housing and equity for all neighborhoods, she also shouldn’t tolerate some residents west of Rock Creek trying to redline growth and change solely to the east.

Unfortunately, while Matthew Frumin has been willing to stand up for (reasonable) growth more vocally than others, this morning’s poll seems to confirm that he is most likely to play a “spoiler” role. Our readers, contributors, and I myself have often wrestled with how to think through the game theory of a race, and decide how much to weigh various policy positions or trade off candidate strengths versus electability.

This post is not an endorsement; our policy is to decide endorsements by a poll of recent, active contributors, which came out clearly for Silverman. On balance, I’m still going to vote for her, too. Besides, zoning isn’t the only issue that matters, and she has some definite strengths on workforce development, oversight of city agencies, and more.

But just because we’ve endorsed should not prevent us from helping inform readers about candidates’ positions, whether or not they comport with our endorsement (in this case, it’s mostly a neutral effect), or holding candidates responsible for staking out good positions.