Collection: Housing public policy from A to Z

Image by 401(K) 2012 licensed under Creative Commons.

What's AMI? the HPTF? a PUD? With these articles, you'll be familiar with the ins and outs of housing policies, which have major impacts on how and where we live, who can live there, and what it costs.

  • Rent control, explained

    The most straightforward way to make sure a family can afford housing is to limit the amount that its rent can rise each year.  Although there are a few different ways to do this, they all fall under the umbrella of “rent control.”   Keep reading…

  • Public housing, explained

    Public housing has long been a tool for governments to create and preserve affordable shelter, but many public housing complexes today are under threat.  Keep reading…

  • Planned Unit Developments, explained

    When it comes to development, there’s often tension between what’s practical or ideal and what the zoning rules at a given site allow. One tool available to builders in DC is called a Planned Unit Development. PUDs allow flexibility in the rules, and since they’re happening all over the city, it’s worth understanding what they are and how they work.  Keep reading…

  • The Housing Production Trust Fund, explained

    The Housing Production Trust Fund (HPTF) is a pot of money used to build affordable housing in DC. Since 2001, money from the fund has helped to produce or preserve nearly 10,000 units of affordable housing.  Keep reading…

  • The Area Median Income (AMI), explained

    There are a number of programs used to create affordable housing in the region, including housing vouchers, inclusionary zoning, low-income housing tax credits and public housing. Each of these programs use a central statistic — the area median income, or AMI — to determine whether families are eligible for the program.  Keep reading…

  • How housing vouchers work, explained

    Millions of Americans struggle to pay their rent each month.  With rents rising and incomes stagnating, paying rent is the largest monthly expenditure for many families.  Keep reading…

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