Rendering of the proposed 615' skyscraper.  Image by Clemente Development Company.

If Fairfax County approves the plans, a skyscraper taller than any in the Chesapeake Bay region could soon rise in Tysons Corner.

The tower, if built, will be 48-stories and 615-feet tall, directly adjacent to Spring Hill Metro station. It would be mainly condos, with some floors reserved for a hotel, and retail along the sidewalk. 

It would be part of a development called The View at Tysons, which would also include shorter office towers, more retail, and a public plaza.

According to developer Dan Clemente, funding is lined up and ready to go as soon as Fairfax grants zoning approval. That will probably take 12-18 months. 

Northern Virginia's high-rise race is eclipsing all neighbors

For over a hundred years, the tallest building in the Washington region (not counting communications towers), has been the Washington Monument, at 555-feet tall. 

If you don't include monuments, Rosslyn has been the region's high-rise king for decades. The current height title goes to two buildings there, each reaching about 390-feet tall. 

But Rosslyn will soon lose out to Tysons one way or another. Even if The View doesn't happen, Capital One tower is under construction now, and at 470-feet tall it'll leave Rosslyn in the proverbial dust.

But The View would take it to another level. Not only would its 615 feet far eclipse Capital One's building, it would be 60 feet taller than the Washington Monument, 107 feet taller than Westin Virginia Beach, the current tallest building in Virginia, and 86 feet taller than Baltimore's Transamerica building, the tallest in Maryland. 

To find a taller building, you'd have to go south as far as Charlotte, or north as far as Philadelphia

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Dan Malouff is a transportation planner for Arlington and professor of geography at George Washington University, but blogs to express personal views. He has a degree in urban planning from the University of Colorado and lives in northeast DC. He runs BeyondDC and contributes to the Washington Post .