Arlington has redesigned and value-engineered a series of transit stations proposed along Columbia Pike, after the original prototype drew criticism for costing a lot and not adequately keeping out the weather. The new design is both less expensive and more effective.


The new design. All images from Arlington County.



Controversy and review

Last year Arlington unveiled the first of a planned series of “super-stop” bus stations along Columbia Pike, near the intersection with Walter Reed Drive. The prototype cost nearly one million dollars, outraging many in the community who felt it extravagantly expensive for “just a bus stop.”

But that wasn’t the only criticism. The prototype’s angled roof and undersized rear and side panels don’t offer much protection against the elements.

Arlington heard the outrage and suspended further construction to review the design. The review came out last week, and proposes a new design that’s significantly cheaper, but also better in a number of ways.

The new design


Elevation (top) and plan view (bottom) of the new design.


Like the prototype, the new design includes a large glass canopy and glass walls, seating, displays with real-time arrival information, and platform-like curbs.

Unlike the prototype, the canopy is a simple boxy shape that’s cheaper and easier to manufacture, more flexible to multiple configurations, and better at keeping out rain and snow. The roof is lower and slopes more gently, meaning rain will have to be falling nearly sideways to get in from the front.

From the back, the rear panels extend higher, closer to the roof. They leave a much smaller gap between the wall and roof, adequate for air circulation but much less prone to let in rain or snow.

Likewise, the side panels are more carefully placed, boxing in the waiting area more effectively.


The new design, showing more effective side panels


The new design eliminates one of the most controversial elements from the prototype, an underground heating system that melts snow and ice. But with this improved canopy and wall layout, fewer elements will get into the station in the first place.

Another major improvement is that real time information will come in multiple ways: On a large main display to one side, and also on displays hung from the roof. The hanging displays will be easier for waiting passengers to see from afar.

And all of this comes via a relatively inexpensive standardized tool kit.


Tool kit of standardized parts.


Since the pieces can fit together any way Arlington wants, they’ll use different configurations at different locations. There will be longer stations with more seating at bigger corners, and smaller ones at more constrained sites.

If the new tool kit proves effective, Arlington may even use some of the same pieces elsewhere, such as in Crystal City.

Arlington is planning to move ahead with construction of the new design at 8 locations up and down Columbia Pike, with more coming after that. The county expects the next 8 stations to be open by 2017.