If Montgomery County is serious about creating walkable places, it must fix dangerous intersections like Hoya Street and Montrose Road in White Flint. Drivers turning right from southbound Hoya to Montrose can’t see pedestrians beginning to cross. A bulb-out would make pedestrians visible and the intersection safer.



Last fall, my mother tried to cross here, and told me that she would have been run over here if she had crossed when the walk signal turned green. So I went to see for myself. Recent pedestrian safety improvements had not made the intersection safe. Drivers turning right from Hoya onto Montrose can’t see pedestrians on the north side of Montrose Road because a wall at the Monterey Apartments complex blocks drivers’ view.

That wall was there before the pedestrian improvements. Why hadn’t the changes included a solution for this hazard?


Image from Google Maps.


The Hoya/Montrose intersection was part of the $117 million Montrose Parkway West project. Before 2010, Montrose Road intersected Old Georgetown Road here, before crossing Rockville Pike and becoming Randolph Road on the other side. But in 2010, Montgomery County finished building the adjacent Montrose Parkway at a cost of $70 million.

The Maryland State Highway Administration (SHA) also finished their own $47.2 million project, which removed the intersection between Montrose Road and Rockville Pike. The end result is that Montrose Road now ends at what used to be part of Old Georgetown Road, now renamed Hoya Street, while Old Georgetown meets Rockville Pike farther south.

Pedestrian safety improvements followed between 2010 and 2012: new curb ramps, a pedestrian refuge in the median of Hoya Street, an improved pedestrian island between the main part of Montrose Road and the slip lane onto southbound Hoya Street, and a marked crosswalk across the slip lane. And yet, nobody in MCDOT or SHA fixed the hazard the wall causes. Why not?


Photo by Peter Blanchard on Flickr.


When asked via email how to make this intersection safe for pedestrians, Bruce Mangum, head of MCDOT’s signals engineering team, said that they will add two signs reading “Turning Traffic Yield To Pedestrians.” One will put one on the traffic signal and the other at street level just behind the curb.

Mangum added that “[n]o amount of engineering (signs, signals, pavement markings) can assure safe intersection operations unless motorists and pedestrians alike know and recognize their respective responsibilities.” But a few more signs won’t make this intersection safe. Research shows that these signs don’t significantly increase the likelihood of drivers yielding to pedestrians during right turns. So extra signage likely won’t help. And that’s at intersections where the drivers can see the pedestrians. Even the most responsible drivers and pedestrians can’t see through a wall.

Fortunately, there actually is an engineering solution that can make the intersection safe: a bulb-out (also called a curb extension), where the sidewalk extends farther toward the middle of the road.

With a bulb-out into Montrose Road, a driver making a right turn would be able to see pedestrians waiting to cross. Also, pedestrians would only cross one lane of traffic, instead of two.

It’s true that a bulb-out would reduce westbound Montrose Road from two lanes to one at the intersection. But since Montrose Road no longer connects with Rockville Pike, it doesn’t need two lanes there anyway. Plus, since this intersection is part of Montgomery County’s transformational 2010 White Flint Sector Plan, pedestrian safety and walkability should be the priority.

Signs alone won’t make this intersection safe for pedestrians. Sooner or later, a right-turning driver will hit a pedestrian here. Installing a bulb-out would prevent this from happening. MCDOT, please do it.