Photo by the author.

Yesterday morning, DC Councilmembers Marion Barry and Tommy Wells went to Annapolis together to brief the Maryland Legislative Black Caucus on the success of DC’s 5¢ disposable bag fee, and ask them to support a similar proposal currently before the Maryland General Assembly.

The Community Cleanup and Greening Act (HB1086/

SB576) would mirror the District’s Anacostia River Cleanup and Protection Act and Montgomery County’s bag law, which impose a 5¢ charge on all disposable plastic and paper bags retailers give out.

As in DC and Montgomery County, the bill intends to reduce the number of disposable bags shoppers use, and thus reduce litter and water pollution. Grocery stores report giving out 70% fewer bags since the fees took effect.

Delegate Michael Summers (D-Prince George’s), a lead sponsor of the bill, introduced Barry as “everybody’s mayor,” and caucus members and the audience responded with a standing ovation. Barry went on to explain how Councilmember Tommy Wells had convinced him of the need for the bill by taking Barry out to the banks of the Anacostia River and showing just how much plastic bags pollute the river.

Wells provided context and rationale for the bag fee, and called it the “most successful environmental initiative in DC.” He described how discount grocery stores like Aldi and Save-a-Lot have never given bags away for free, as part of their commitment to keeping prices as low as possible.

Barry concluded the briefing by urging his Maryland counterparts to “have courage,” noting that the “community benefits are worth far more than five cents.” After the meeting, Barry committed to further supporting the effort. “We have to do more to educate them,” he said.

While the Anacostia River has seen significant reductions in plastic bag pollution, more than half of the river’s watershed is in Prince George’s County, which does not yet have a bag fee.

The Community Cleanup and Greening Act was heard by the Senate’s Education, Health, and Environmental Affairs Committee on Tuesday. The next public hearing, before the House Environmental Matters Committee, is scheduled for March 8. In addition to Summers, the bill’s sponsors are Delegate Mary Washington (D-Baltimore City), Senator Jamie Raskin (D-Montgomery), and Senator Brian Frosh (D-Montgomery).