Some of DC’s residential neighborhoods feel a lot more like a city than others— just compare Capitol Hill’s small row houses and the mid-century homes in upper Forest Hills, for example. These maps show the big divide between DC’s inner and outer sections when it comes to house type, year built, and lot size.


Maps by the author.



In each map, there’s an almost-identical area of light shading across the area that stretches from Capitol Hill to Georgetown and from Shaw up to Petworth. Generally, houses closer to DC’s core are almost all older row houses built on smaller lots, while those closer to the edges tend to be newer single or semi-detached houses on larger pieces of land.




The divide becomes more distinct when looking at the data by ward. Here are DC’s wards:


DC’s wards. Image from the DC Office of Planning.


Below, you can see the median year a home was built, the median lot size, and the percent of homes that are not row houses. Wards 1, 2 and 6, which make up the inner part of the city, are all grouped together on the left.



Ward 2 has, on median, the oldest homes. The true median may even be older than 1900; that year is often used as default for building year when one cannot be determined. Homes in Wards 7 and 8 are the newest.

A peculiar vestige of the L’Enfant Plan— the fact that homeowners in the old city do not own their front yards— may slightly downplay lot size within the inner city, so I didn’t include front yards in lot size.

Ward 3 is by far the least residentially dense ward, with a median lot size of 5,100 square feet, three times that of Ward 6. Ward 3 also has the fewest row houses. In the inner wards, more than 80% of all homes are row houses.

A version of this post originally ran at DataLensDC.

Kate Rabinowitz is the creator of datalensdc.com, a website dedicated to visualizing the District through data. She resides in a Capitol Hill alley home and enjoys data mining, board games, and wandering city streets.