A fall sunset on Greenbelt Lake at Buddy Attick Park. Photo by Matt Johnson.

With spring weather almost here, it’s time to get out and enjoy the less concrete-filled parts of our region. We asked our contributors to tell us about their favorite outdoor spots and why they love them. We also gave bonus points for places you can get to by transit!

The answers were as wide-reaching as our contributor base itself, but the District had the highest concentration of locations. We’ll start there, then get to Maryland and Virginia.

Payton Chung named some downtown and Georgetown favorites:

The urban blocks of the C&O Canal in Georgetown don’t just let you snack on a cupcake next to a waterfall while dreaming of escaping it all and riding a CaBi deep into the woods. You also get a great glimpse at what urban places (and transportation) looked like before the car.

Pershing Park is perhaps the most thoughtfully designed park in downtown DC, and a great quiet escape on a hot summer day.

One of the more fantastical park experiences in the District is to run a kayak aground on Theodore Roosevelt Island or Kingman Island and pretend you’re an early explorer who’s discovered an uninhabited island.

Dumbarton Oaks Park was Topher Mathews’ pick:

Dumbarton is a hidden corner of Rock Creek Park tucked below its more famous and rich Harvard-owned sister in Georgetown. It has woods, glades, and a meandering stream criss-crossed by stone bridges, and it’s a beautiful example of landscape architecture by one of the country’s preeminent landscape architects, Beatrix Farrand.

Tracey Johnstone enjoys the grounds of the National Cathedral:

It’s on a hill, so there’s often a refreshing breeze. Some of the lawns are large enough you can play catch without endangering others.  Or you can sit in the rose garden on the lower, south side of the grounds.  There are secluded benches and some small lawns ringed by azaleas and other foliage.  It’s a great place to read or to have a picnic.

On top of Rock Creek Park and Beech Drive, both of which are largely closed to motor vehicles on weekends, Eric Fidler noted another road, Ross Drive, which parallels Beach Drive south of Military Road but runs along the ridge. It provides great views of the valley and gets very little car traffic. There are moments on Ross Drive when you can stop and not hear or see any signs of human civilization (aside from the road pavement, of course). It’s surreal to think such a place exists in DC.”

On warm weekends, you’ll probably find Mitch Wander out on the river:

Fletcher’s Boathouse at Fletcher’s Cove is an absolute outdoors gem. You can rent rowboats and canoes to explore the Potomac River and C&O Canal. The fishing is beyond wonderful. Fletcher’s Boathouse staff can sell you everything needed, including fishing gear, the required DC fishing license, and insider tips, to catch a variety of fish. Over the coming weeks, the annual shad migration from the Chesapeake Bay will a fishing experience not to be missed. The D6 bus goes to MacArthur Boulevard and then you can walk down to the Boathouse.

“Frederick Douglass National Historic Site has the greatest panorama of the city,” added John Muller.

Another great view can be had from the top of the hill at Fort Reno Park, one of Claire Jaffe’s favorite spots growing up. “It might be partly the nostalgia factor, but it is the highest land point in the city and has a nice view of the surrounding area. Especially in the warmer months when it’s green and sunny, it’s a wonderful place to sit and relax. You can also run up and down the hill… if that is what you’re into.”

Tina Jones gives a shout-out to the Melvin Hazen Trail:

The trail crosses Melvin Hazen Creek three times en route to the confluence with Rock Creek. At the eastern end there’s a big, open green field, a covered picnic pavilion with a fireplace, bathrooms, Pierce Mill and the fish ladder, and access to more trails north and south.

From the west, you can get there from Connecticut Ave at Rodman Street, just north of the Cleveland Park metro, and by the L1, L2, and H2 buses. From the east it’s accessible on foot from Mount Pleasant.

David Koch went with a classic, Meridian Hill Park:

It has a great classic design and a location that can’t be beat, and it’s mostly well-maintained by the National Park Service. It always brings a smile to my face to see the sheer variety of uses that it gets from locals, from picnics to Frisbee to yoga to tightrope walking, not to mention Sunday’s drum circle. There’s also a multitude of quiet, secluded places you can find to read a book in solitude, even on the most packed weekend afternoons. I’d say it’s the closest thing DC has to Central Park, pace the Mall.

Speaking of the Mall, Canaan Merchant gave “America’s front yard” his nod, saying how much he enjoys people watching there while he bikes home in the summer.

Personally, I’ll add the National Arboretum, a sprawling green space off New York Ave NE accessible by bike from NoMa or Eastern Market Metro stations as well as via the B2 bus. There’s also Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens on the other side of the Anacostia River from the Arboretum, easily walkable or bikeable from Deanwood Metro, and Hains Point, a great biking spot along the Potomac.

To close off the District review, Neil Flanagan noted the solace to be found at Rock Creek Cemetery, and Dan Malouff called Dupont Circle “perfectly awesome” for its “mix of hard plazas versus landscaping, of city noise versus calm serenity, and of grand landmarks versus intimate hideaways.”

Our contributors’ Maryland favorites

Greenbelter Matt Johnson makes Buddy Attick Park part of his walk home from the bus when the weather is nice. It “surrounds Greenbelt Lake, and is an integral part of the green belt that surrounds and permeates the planned community. Some of the neighborhoods closest to the park have direct access to the loop trail that encircles the lake. And the town center is just steps away from the east entrance. The easy access and bucolic setting means that almost always, the park is full of families picnicking, teens playing sports, joggers exercising, and couples strolling.”

Katie Gerbes loves Lake Artemesia in Berwyn Heights, alongside the Green Line between College Park and Greenbelt. “The lake has lots of gazebos, fishing spots, and a trail going around it. It also connects to the Paint Branch Trail, so a trip to the lake can be part of a larger run or bike ride. It gets a little buggy with gnats in the summertime, but it’s a great place for a leisurely walk in the spring and fall.”

Jeff Lemieux also takes to the outdoors in that part of Prince George’s County:

My favorite natural spaces in the DC area are USDA’s Beltsville Agricultural Research Center and MNCPPC‘s Anacostia Tributary trail system. USDA allows bike riding on most roadways through the research farms, which affords a lovely rural experience in the midst of sprawling suburbia. The Anacostia Tributary trails provide scenic recreation and also form the spine of an extensive commuter bike network in northern Prince George’s county. Both areas are easily accessible from the Green Line’s College Park and Greenbelt stations.

Closing out Maryland, Little Bennett Regional Park in northern Montgomery County is great for rambles in the woods. The downside is that it’s only barely transit-accessible, via RideOn route 94 — I used a Zipcar to access it.

Virginia destinations

Meadowlark Park, Northern Virginia’s only botanical garden, got praise from Jenifer Joy Madden:

Meadowlark Park near Tysons Corner. Photo by Jenifer Joy Madden.

There, paved trails wind through rolling formal gardens and around sparkling ponds. Wilder paths draw you into the woods and great stands of native species. Kids love the Children’s Garden, where they are encouraged to smell and touch the fragrant herbs and flowers.

Only a few months ago, the Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority opened a beautiful paved trail that connects cyclists on the W&OD trail with Meadowlark. Also, Fairfax Connector 432 now gets within striking distance of Meadowlark, but unfortunately it only runs Monday through Friday during rush hours.

Agn├Ęs Artemel recommended Great Falls Park and Huntley Meadows Park (both in Fairfax County), along with Daingerfield Island and Marina and Winkler Preserve (in Alexandria) for nature lovers, and added she appreciates the stream and trees along Spout Run Parkway between the George Washington Parkway and Lee Highway in Arlington.

There’s also the well-known Mount Vernon Trail, hugging the river through Alexandria and Arlington. And Founders Park on Alexandria’s waterfront and Ben Brenman Park at Cameron Station, also in Alexandria, deserve mention as great open spaces.

Adam Froehlig, an avid hiker, goes a little farther afield, pointing out the hiking trails along the north side of the Occoquan and along Bull Run. There’s Fountainhead Regional Park towards Manassas, as well as the Appalachian Trail, which isn’t all that far from DC and is accessible by commuter rail, as it runs through Harper’s Ferry, West Virginia, and served by MARC and Amtrak.

And when it comes to wildlife watching, nothing beats the beaver-tended wetlands of Fairfax’s Huntley Meadows Park, accessible via Fairfax Connector routes 161 and 162, which connect it to Huntington Metro.

Do you have a question? Each week, we’ll post a question to the Greater Greater Washington contributors and post appropriate parts of the discussion. You can suggest questions by emailing ask@ggwash.org. Questions about factual topics are most likely to be chosen. Thanks!