As US bikesharing continues to boom, it’s fun to look back each year and see how systems have grown. Now that we’re into the grind of 2015, let’s look back on 2014 and see what changed.

2014 was a modest year for US bikesharing expansion, compared to the incredible boom of 2013. Overall, the number of bikeshare stations nationwide increased about 20%, from 1,925 in 2013 to 2,345 in 2014.

San Diego Seattle launched the largest new system, with 117

49 stations.

Washington’s Capital Bikeshare regained its crown as largest overall network, growing from 305 stations to 347 stations. Last year’s champ, New York’s Citibike, actually lost two stations and dropped from 330 to 328. Chicago rounds out the top tier, with the same number of stations it had last year: 300 exactly.  No other system tops 200 stations.

 

Fourteen

Thirteen new bikesharing systems opened nationwide, and four small existing ones closed, bringing the US total up to 49 active systems.

Here’s the complete list of all US systems. New ones are marked in bold. Previous years are available for comparison.

Rank City 2013 Stations 2014 Stations
1 Washington (regional) 305 347
2 New York 330 328
3 Chicago 300 300
4 Minneapolis (regional) 170 169
5 Boston (regional) 132 140
6 San Diego 0 117
7 Miami Beach 97 94
8 Denver 81 83
9 San Francisco (regional) 67 70
10 San Antonio 51 53
11 Seattle 0 49
12 Austin 11 45
13 Boulder 22 38
14(t) Fort Worth 34 34
14(t) Miami 0 34
16 Chattanooga 33 33
17 Columbus 30 30
18(t) Madison 32 29
18(t) Cincinnati 0 29
20 Houston 29 28
21 Indianapolis 0 26
22 Omaha 8 25
23(t) Nashville 22 24
23(t) Charlotte 21 24
23(t) Phoenix 0 ~24
26 Ft Lauderdale (regional) 25 21
27(t) Kansas City 12 20
27(t) Salt Lake City 12 20
29 Aspen 12 15
30 Long Beach, NY 13 14
31 Washington State Univ (Pullman, WA) 9 11
32 Milwaukee 0 10
33 Greenville, SC 6 8
34(t) Oklahoma City 7 7
34(t) Tampa 0 ~7
36(t) Des Moines 6 6
36(t) Ann Arbor 0 6
38 Univ of Buffalo (Buffalo, NY) 4 5
39(t) Univ of Califonia Irvine (Irvine, CA) 4 4
39(t) Spartanburg, SC 4 4
41(t) Tulsa 4 3
41(t) Louisville 3 3
41(t) Stony Brook Univ (Stony Brook, NY) 3 3
44(t) Kailua, HI 2 2
44(t) Roseburg VA Hospital (Roseburg, OR) 2 2
44(t) Hailey, ID 2

~2
44(t) Rapid City 0 2
44(t) Savannah 0 2
44(t) Dallas 0 2
44(t) Orlando 0 ~2
Fullerton, CA (closed) 10 0
Georgia Tech (Atlanta, Ga) (closed) 9 0
George Mason Univ (Fairfax, VA) (closed) 7 0
Lansing (closed) 4 0

Systems marked with a ~ are stationless bikeshare networks, in which each bike contains a lock and can be docked anywhere. The number of “stations” listed for three of these four systems (Phoenix, Tampa, and Orlando) is approximate and was calculated by dividing the overall number of bicycles by eight. The fourth system, Hailey, has only six bikes but they’re located in two distinct clusters, so it seems most appropriate to report two stations.

Counting the number of bikes rather than stations would be a more accurate way to rank systems, but that information is more difficult and time-consuming to obtain.

Correction: This post originally reported that San Diego’s bikeshare network opened in 2014. It was originally scheduled to do so, but delays pushed its opening to 2015.

Cross-posted at BeyondDC.

Dan Malouff is a transportation planner for Arlington and an adjunct professor at George Washington University. He has a degree in urban planning from the University of Colorado and lives in Trinidad, DC. He runs BeyondDC and contributes to the Washington Post. Dan blogs to express personal views, and does not take part in GGWash's political endorsement decisions.