Some residents have received this flyer, which urges them to “SAY NO! TO CORNER STORES” in the DC Zoning Update. But on closer inspection, it’s hard to tell how the flyer is arguing against corner stores.


Almost all of the text (and the photo) come directly from the DC Office of Planning’s fact sheet which lays out the case for corner stores: more potential access to healthy food, ability to shop nearby without a long drive, and rules to ensure the stores don’t harm neighbors.

Rather than argue against these, the flyer just repeats the same rationale, with a few comments sprinkled in like “DO YOU BELIEVE THIS?” and “YOU DECIDE.”

Is this for real? Or, as David Garber mused, “genius marketing *for* corner stores and the DC Zoning Update”?

Mark Bjorge pointed out, “It’s a Rorschach test. Answers will depend on where one lives.” What he means is that in many neighborhoods, the basic word “corner store” conjures up images of a run-down store that just sells junk food and liquor and cigarettes and the like from behind metal gates or thick plexiglass, and with folks hanging out in front up to no good.

I’ve spoken to people from some neighborhoods who immediately thought of that the moment they heard about the proposal. In fact, the address on the flyer is from a section of Petworth where some corner stores have looked like that. Within that context, reading the OP fact sheet one might well have exactly this reaction of disbelief.

Perhaps this is another example like this exchange from a year ago where zoning update opponent Linda Schmitt posted a photograph of an alley accessory dwelling. To her, it perfectly illustrated what residents should fear. But to me and many others, the well-maintained, attractive, clean little brick building was instead an ideal example of why accessory dwellings sounded great.


In neighborhoods with higher-quality stores, the idea of bringing in a small grocery within walking distance sounds great. Residents of the Navy Yard neighborhood can enjoy Cornercopia, the store pictured in the OP fact sheet and the flyer, which embodies what people want in such a store. Those who feel confident that looser restrictions on zoning might bring in a desirable amenity instead of blight, therefore, are excited about zoning opening the door to such an asset.

To help ensure that new stores are only positive and not negative, OP has dialed back the corner store proposal so that now any store, except a grocery, will need a public hearing and a “special exception.” It is also fair for people to demand that DC enforce the rules that limit the amount of trash and noise a store could generate.

If you think that corner stores aren’t automatically a bad thing for every neighborhood, you’ve got one last chance to let the Zoning Commission know. There are three more public hearings on the zoning update this week.

David Alpert is the founder of Greater Greater Washington and its board president. He worked as a Product Manager for Google for six years and has lived in the Boston, San Francisco, and New York metro areas in addition to Washington, DC. He lives with his wife and two children in Dupont Circle.