TransportationRSS

Photo by marlordo59 licensed under Creative Commons

Greater Greater Washington writes about how people get around the Washington region, whether on Metro, buses, streetcars, driving, walking, biking, or any other method.

One of the region’s strengths is the wide range of options for travel. There are many walkable places in DC, Maryland, and Virginia where people could choose transit, walk or bike, or if they don’t have their own car, grab a shared vehicle or hail a ride. This reduces the need to own cars, saving people money and reducing traffic congestion.

As our region grows, it is imperative to continue to make these options safe, economical, and available to even more people. It is imperative to ensure safe sidewalks and bicycle infrastructure, expand transit options, and add housing near existing transit stations.

  • I may have been too hard on Richard Rothblum

    I mocked Cleveland Park ANC commissioner Richard Rothblum who made free parking one of his top New Year’s wishes. Over on the Cleveland Park list, the parking discussion has taken a sensible turn, as all the people who want more free parking for themselves and more restrictions for everyone else have given way to some basic economic sense, including from Richard Rothblum. One…  Keep reading…

  • Ward 3 parking vision

    The Ward 3 Vision community group, which is affiliated with the Coalition for Smarter Growth, has a page up about parking management in residential areas, including flyers and powerpoints about the issue. This is in response to the ongoing debate over visitor passes in Cleveland Park.  Keep reading…

  • WMATA fantasy combo map

    Many proposals are floating around for Metro expansion. Some have been thoroughly researched by government and are just waiting for funding, like the Dulles extension. Others are just suggestions from activists and bloggers. Many are somewhere in between. To show the ideas in one place, I’ve created this fantasy map. Click on the map for a large version, and see below…  Keep reading…

  • South Capitol: L’Enfant strikes back

    From the South Capitol EIS:As a primary corridor in L’Enfant’s 1791 Plan for the City of Washington, South Capitol Street was envisioned as one of the symbolic gateways to the city and its Monumental Core. ... Today, South Capitol Street lacks any characteristics of its historic and intended function as a gateway. ... South Capitol Street is an urban freeway that has…  Keep reading…

  • Popular parking at the Poplar park?

    Council Chairman Vincent Gray is suggesting that any parking built on Poplar Point for a soccer stadium could be used for baseball games at other times. It’s not a bad idea, as long as the parking is charged at market rate. On the other hand, I wonder how needed it will be—if the ballpark can get by for a few years without Poplar, people will already be used to taking Metro, and…  Keep reading…

  • NYC discusses blank walls

    Streetsblog spoke with New York’s Department of City Planning about the new blank wall buildings going up on Brooklyn’s Fourth Avenue, which Streetsblog and I criticized. DCP explained why they didn’t require retail, and how the minimum parking requirements forced garages onto these buildings.  Keep reading…

  • Cleveland Park(ing) puzzles, part 2

    The email discussion on Cleveland Park’s list continues over whether to give residents free visitor parking passes, which they can give to out of town guests, nannies, contractors, or possibly sell to commuters, to park for free. Quite simply, the demand for parking outstrips the supply. There is demand to park on neighborhood streets from residents, guests, domestic…  Keep reading…

  • Cleveland Park(ing) puzzles

    Photo by KCIveyCleveland Park, the neighborhood whose ANC commissioner prioritized more free parking right after world peace on his New Year’s wish list, is abuzz once more about parking on their email list, DC’s most prolific neighborhood list. This time, it’s over a DDOT proposal to give residents visitor parking passes, like they are doing in Ward 4. Some…  Keep reading…

  • Less parking at 14th and U would solve many problems

    At Wednesday’s Dupont Circle ANC meeting, architect Eric Colbert presented revised plans for the 14th and U development proposal. The ANC still wants to make it smaller, but beyond the classic fight over density, this project is a perfect example of the silly and detrimental effects of minimum parking requirements. Current zoning requires one space per two units for…  Keep reading…

  • Seattle’s waterfront freeway may come down

    Thanks to the efforts of Seattle’s People’s Waterfront Coalition, Seattle will be  Keep reading…

  • Lauriol Parking Improvement District?

    I live a block from Lauriol Plaza, a Mexican restaurant popular for its large size, drinks, and outdoor and roof seating. On weekend evenings, parking is very scarce as scores of people drive to Lauriol and circle around and around the neighborhood streets in search of parking. This is a great opportunity to try creative parking policy like a Parking Improvement District. If we…  Keep reading…

  • Poplar Point may get a deck over I-295

    Mayor Fenty has chosen Clark Realty to develop Poplar Point, a large waterfront site near the Anacostia Green Line station. And Now, Anacostia was rooting for Clark, most significantly because their plan included building a deck over part of I-295, connecting Poplar Point to the rest of the Anacostia neighborhood. If you can’t convert a freeway to a boulevard, covering it…  Keep reading…

  • Parking isn’t a good reason to move the Rockville courthouse

    The Montgomery County courthouse, in the county seat of Rockville, is old and badly needs replacing. Maryland is ready to pay for a new courthouse on a downtown site formerly occupied by the library, but some people want to move it. There are good arguments for moving it and for not moving it. There are also some very bad arguments. In particular, many who advocate changing the location…  Keep reading…

  • Digging the parking hole deeper

    The Washington area is deeply schizophrenic about whether it wants to be a city of driving and parking or of people and transit. While DC is working hard to put mixed-use high-density development next to many of its stations, plans in Foggy Bottom and West Hyattsville call for more parking than should be necessary. Whether a city is car-dependent or transit-accessible is…  Keep reading…

  • New Partners: Frustrating Transit Administrators

    I jumped in to a panel on streetcars fairly late. It featured people from Portland, Tuscon, and other cities that have recently deployed streetcars. When I came in, they were expressing major frustration with the FTA and its decisionmaking.  Keep reading…

  • New Partners: Congestion pricing and transportation finance

    The panel at the New Partners conference on transportation finance featured NYC’s congestion pricing hero Bruce Schaller, and Michael Replogle of Environmental Defense. As David Burwell of Project for Public Spaces said when he introduced the panel: The transportation trust fund is broke—not just broken, but broke. Actually, the highway fund is broke now, and the…  Keep reading…

  • Maryland worried about new transit-hostile FTA

    According to the Post, Maryland officials are nervous that the Federal (not-so-excited-about-)Transit Administration will reject the Purple Line or the Corridor Cities Transitway (along I-270) as it did (or at least delayed) the Silver Line to Dulles, even though the Purple Line will cost significantly less. Maryland already delayed the Purple Line application process one…  Keep reading…

  • New Partners: Earl Blumenauer and Mary Landrieu

    Senator Mary Landrieu of Louisiana and Congressman Earl Blumenauer of Oregon, whose district includes Portland, joined in a roundtable discussion. Blumenauer had strong words for the Bush Administration on its transportation policy, especially the recent commission report, where language in favor of increasing the gas tax was cut out. Blumenauer: the commission was set…  Keep reading…

  • Is The Yards waterfront park bike-friendly?

    At the panel on Southeast Federal Center, I asked Pat Daniels of GSA and Ramsey Meiser of Forest City about the bike design for the park, which appears to cram bikers, rollerbladers, runners and others into a narrow sharply-anged pathway at the edge of the park. Meiser and Daniels were confident that the park was going to be bike-friendly, though they couldn’t respond specifically…  Keep reading…

  • The passion of parking policy

    A roomful of people gave two hours of their evening last night to attend a panel sponsored by the Coalition for Smarter Growth at the Downtown BID about parking policy. Many joked privately beforehand that parking is quite a boring-sounding topic to generate such fascination, including Councilmember Tommy Wells, who spoke at the beginning. He came up with the slogan of “walkable,…  Keep reading…

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