TransportationRSS

Photo by marlordo59 licensed under Creative Commons

Greater Greater Washington writes about how people get around the Washington region, whether on Metro, buses, streetcars, driving, walking, biking, or any other method.

One of the region’s strengths is the wide range of options for travel. There are many walkable places in DC, Maryland, and Virginia where people could choose transit, walk or bike, or if they don’t have their own car, grab a shared vehicle or hail a ride. This reduces the need to own cars, saving people money and reducing traffic congestion.

As our region grows, it is imperative to continue to make these options safe, economical, and available to even more people. It is imperative to ensure safe sidewalks and bicycle infrastructure, expand transit options, and add housing near existing transit stations.

  • More than a thousand words

    None but the most corrupt of politicians would think that moving Yankee Stadium over to a public park, farther from the highway, replacing that park with some space on top of garages and other parkland crammed up against the river far away from the neighborhood, and having the city kick in $70 million for this, could possibly be a good idea.  Keep reading…

  • Grand Street is crazy wide

    Last night, heading to a party on the Lower East Side, I decided to drive.  As Transportation Alternatives’ recent study (PDF) showed, the top reason most people who drive into or out of Manhattan do so is because it’s faster.  And from Hoboken to the LES late on a Saturday night, it sure is, and (once you already have paid the sunk cost of having a car) cheaper too:…  Keep reading…

  • Thin layer of ice found in hell

    Smart growth, transit-oriented development - there are many names for the idea of building mixed-use, walkable communities.  Whatever you call it, it’s starting to catch on in suburban communities from San Mateo to Silver Spring.  But most are areas with existing transit, near to already walkable cities.  What about America’s great bastions of…  Keep reading…

  • WMATA expansion plans

    New York City’s subway first opened in 1904, and Boston’s in 1908; but by the 1960s, Washington DC still had no subway system.  A comprehensive plan designed at that time has by now been built, with a few changes.  Therefore, WMATA has developed a new master plan to keep systems in good repair, extend trains to eight cars, make pedestrian access improvements,…  Keep reading…

  • Westwood Station

    In Westwood, MA is the Route 128 rail station, a stop on Amtrak’s Acela and Regional trains between Boston and the rest of the Northeast Corridor cities to the south.  It is also a stop on the MBTA’s commuter rail, and immediately off Massachusetts’ Route 128, (in that area at least) better know to the rest of the country as I-95.  Keep reading…

  • Build This California!

    San Francisco is one of California’s few dense, walkable cities.  Many San Francisco residents do not own cars and get around on a daily basis using public transportation.  Keep reading…

  • A backbone for people and bicycles

    I first read about this idea in the RPA’s analysis of congestion pricing, but now that traffic reduction ideas are a talked-about topic, another more radical idea has hit the blogs: closing Broadway to traffic.  Paul White of TA brings up the idea in a Gothamist interview, and MemeFirst follows up with some more detailed detailed thoughts.  Keep reading…

  • Congestion pricing, pro and incoherent

    Enjoying a new spate of publicity, the idea of congestion pricing rated a pair of columns, pro and con, in the Daily News.  The pro article, by Paul White of Transportation Alternatives, laid out some clear arguments backed up by facts: London’s pilot program reduced traffic 18% and sped up travel by 30%, in addition to generating revenue for mass transit projects.  Keep reading…

  • Congestion pricing: an idea whose time is coming

    Congestion pricing in Manhattan below 60th Street is “being whispered in the ears of City Hall officials” according to the Times (in an article written by Sewell Chan!)  It’s an idea that keeps popping up, for the simple reason that it’s an obvious, huge win.  The only obstacles are inertia, and Queens councilmembers representing a small minority…  Keep reading…

  • News flash: people drive more if there is parking

    A study from San Francisco State shows something that should be obvious, but isn’t to the New York City Council: if there are fewer parking spaces, people choose to drive less.  Therefore, San Francisco should limit the amount of parking in new developments, rather than requiring a certain amount as it does today. More about free parking, and its costs, in this SF Chronicle editorial.  Keep reading…

  • City Council takes some stupid pills

    It’s the most basic rule of economics - if something costs more, people will do it less, and vice versa.    Keep reading…

  • Memorable Phrases for Parks

    I’m in the bloggers’ area of the Parks1 Mayoral Forum.  Up on stage, Democrats Gifford Miller, Virginia Fields, Freddy Ferrer, and Republican Tom Ognibene, are telling us why they all love parks.  Keep reading…

  • Purple Line

    In the DC area, more jobs are continuing to move to the suburban areas outside the city.  The way the regional authorities handle this growth will have a great deal of influence on whether the growth leads to more walkable, transit-oriented communities or to more sprawl.  Keep reading…

  • Green along the blue

    In New York City’s industrial past, waterfronts were industrial zones.  New York became America’s largest city by being America’s busiest port.  Manhattan’s coastlines were piers and warehouses, for transferring goods between ships; the entire waterfront of Jersey City was railyards where goods would switch between ship and train.  Consequently, the land in the middle of Manhattan…  Keep reading…

  • El Camino Bonito

    I walked across El Camino Real - once.  This road, once the main thoroughfare through Silicon Valley, is now a 50 mile long strip mall of motels, gas stations, mattress stores, car rental places, fast food, and one major university.  Every business or shopping center along its length has a parking lot.  In the utopia of sprawl, El Camino Real would be Main Street.  Keep reading…

  • Harvard’s Allston plan: wow

    The architects hired by Harvard University to study locating facilities in Allston have created an interim report, and it’s really nice.  If Harvard really implements most of it, rather than getting cheap and cutting the more expensive pieces which improve quality of life, it sounds as though a really nice new campus might result.  I’m pleasantly surprised,…  Keep reading…

  • Two plans for Times Square

    Times Square was once a seedy place that many New Yorkers avoided, except for brief forays to a Broadway show.  Today, many New Yorkers still avoid it, but for the opposite reason - it is really, really crowded.  According to the Times Square Alliance, streets in Times Square burst with up to 16,817 people per hour on the busiest sidewalks, plus 1,279 people who can’t…  Keep reading…

  • The congestion pricing idea spreads

    San Francisco sees the light too.  But this isn’t so much of a surprise since they already have a pretty progressive attitude toward automobiles.  When will New York?  Keep reading…

  • They’re smart up in Boston

    I just ran across this month-old news report that Boston is considering London-style congestion pricing for roads downtown.  The idea is that during peak hours, drivers would pay $1-$5 to drive into the most congested downtown areas, and the money raised would go to public transportation improvements.  Mayor Menino is reportedly even open to considering the idea. …  Keep reading…

  • Go go gadget transportation!

    I just got off the NJ Transit bus #126 coming home from Drinking Liberally.  Coming back after a late night at Rudy’s was never so painless.  I knew a bus left at 12:55 (after midnight they’re every 30 minutes), so I walked out at 12:45, made it to the bus a few minutes before departure, and was already home by 1:15.  Compare this to walking all the way to 7th…  Keep reading…

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