Posts about TransitRSS

  • Breakfast bites

    Obama, Clinton ride transit but don’t talk about it: Clinton and Obama both have good, though vague, plaforms on transportation policy, writes the Philadelphia Daily News. But transportation hasn’t been an issue in the campaign, while America needs visionary thinking in transportation. One thing’s for sure, but not in the article: McCain is much worse, by…  Keep reading…

  • Nationals play on a weeknight, world still doesn’t end

    Despite some doomsday predictions, the Nationals’ first weeknight game also went smoothly, with Metro again handling the crowds without any significant problems. The parking lots were half empty (though the game wasn’t sold out), and the bike parking got some use despite the rain.  Keep reading…

  • Mid-city renaissance thanks to Metro

    Sunday’s Washington Post has a feature article on the path from burned-out ghetto to high-priced condo in Columbia Heights, Shaw, H Street and other corridors destroyed in the 1968 riots. Suburbanization and desegregation pushed affluent people, black and white, to move out to suburbs, and the riots destroyed the remaining economic fabric. Federal and municipal disinvestment…  Keep reading…

  • Stadium opens without parking, world doesn’t end

    If you are in the DC area and haven’t been living under a rock, you know that DC’s brand-new (and entirely taxpayer-funded) stadium opened last weekend. You also know that the city built remarkably few parking lots, telling fans to take Metro, bike (using the free bike valet) or take a shuttle from parking lots at RFK Stadium.  Keep reading…

  • Alexandria gets a “trolley”

    The first time I went to Old Town Alexandria, I thought, “there needs to be a trolley along King Street from the Metro to the waterfront.” Well, now there is. Sorta. It’s really a bus dressed up as a trolley, which DC Metrocentric sneers at but I think has merit: a dinging trolley probably would be more appealing to visitors who shop at the high-end boutiques and chain…  Keep reading…

  • BeyondDC’s map

    Continuing the trend of transit expansion maps like mine and Track Twenty-Nine’s, Dan of BeyondDC has a transit vision. He won’t call it a “fantasy map” because this is no fantasy: by building only half the Silver Line and using the money for more streetcars, the construction cost ought to be little more than what has been seriously proposed in recent years.  Keep reading…

  • Waiting for the L2

    The L2 bus travels along Connecticut Avenue from Friendship Heights, detours through Adams Morgan, down 18th and New Hampshire through Dupont, and then along K Street to McPherson Square. It also runs right past my window. I started keeping track of its actual times and compared them to the schedule. (Click for a bigger version). This chart shows how much time you are likely…  Keep reading…

  • Post streetcar map

    The Post has a good map of proposed streetcar and BRT routes, modeled off the ones from DDOT and others that I use in my map. Via Richard Layman.  Keep reading…

  • A 21st-century Eisenhower

    President Eisenhower’s most lasting achievement is either the term “military-  Keep reading…

  • Transportation Commission report dissected

    Rob Goodspeed ordered a copy of the mammoth National Surface Transportation Policy and Revenue Study Commission report—the one with which DOT Secretary Mary Peters disagreed and from which some Administration officials removed parts. Rob has a detailed yet clear analysis of the report’s key recommendations.  Keep reading…

  • Proposed “Blue Line split”: why blue?

    Last month, WMATA announced it was considering a service change to “shift some peak period Blue Line trains to operate over the Yellow Line bridge to L’Enfant Plaza to Greenbelt.” WMATA’s diagram and the Post’s map show this new service in blue. But why?  Keep reading…

  • More connectivity for ChiPitts

    Creative Class scholar Richard Florida (one of the six authors on my great urbanism books list, at the bottom of the sidebar) feels poor transit connectivity between Pittsburgh and Chicago is holding back the “ChiPitts” megalopolis, 85% the size of “BosWash.”  Keep reading…

  • Triboro RX lives again

    Thinking very long-term, New York’s MTA CEO Lee Sander dusted off the “Triboro RX” plan of a circumferential subway line from Brooklyn to the Bronx along the lightly used freight railroad rights-of-way. New York has been wanting the Second Avenue Subway for 70 years, and now that it’s actually being built, space has opened up on the somewhat-pie-in-the-…  Keep reading…

  • Google Maps: Bike There

    There’s a site with a petition for Google Maps to add a “bike there” option showing directions by bike, including bike lanes. Great idea, though the obstacle to Bike There is finding bike lane data. While we’re at it, how about just a “walk there”?   Keep reading…

  • Bush budget terrible for cities

    Not only is President Bush seeking to raid the transit trust fund to pay for more highways, it cuts funding for Amtrak and eliminates the HOPE VI program that is helping cities like DC turn failed urban renewal projects into desirable mixed-income housing. Smart Growth America has a detailed analysis and is asking citizens to urge their Congresspeople to reject these terrible priorities.  Keep reading…

  • BRT won’t work for Tysons & Dulles

    Paul Weyrich, the leading conservative advocate for rail, argues for the Metro extension and against BRT in a Post op-ed.  Keep reading…

  • Fire Mary Peters

    The Teamsters have a campaign going to fire US DOT Secretary Mary Peters for continuing a program that lets Mexican trucks haul freight in the US with lower safety standards. It’s a good cause, but it’s not the only reason Mary Peters ought to be fired—there’s her dislike for bike paths, unenthusiasm for transit, and opposition to gas tax increases are all…  Keep reading…

  • Sci-fi coast to coast high speed rail network

    Imagine that long-distance, very high speed rail lines (airplane speeds or better) were practical and relatively cheap to build. What might the resulting transit-like intercity service look like? Working on the recent DC fantasy maps reminded me of this map which I created years ago. Here it is, dusted off for your pleasure. Click on the map for a larger version. More…  Keep reading…

  • Strike two for NoVa transit

    The Post’s Get There has a list of the transportation projects in jeopardy now that the Virginia Supreme Court struck down the law authorizing the Northern Virginia Transportation Authority. Between an anti-transit USDOT and a largely anti-transit state legislature, it’s tough to be Northern Virginia.  Keep reading…

  • “There is not going to be a Quaker Oats Metro station”

    Councilmember Jim Graham (rightly) put to rest speculation that DC may rename the Navy Yard Metro station after the corporate sponsor who buys naming rights to the new ballpark. Meanwhile, New York announced plans to rename every station on the 4 and D trains after corporations with all the money going to the Yankees. OK, they didn’t, but if Hank Steinbrenner were to hang out…  Keep reading…

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