Posts about TransitRSS

  • Suburbanites enjoy amenities but have no time for them

    The Post asked readers to write about what they loved about their homes, and Marc Fisher has a summary. Everyone, city and suburb, enjoyed public spaces and contact with neighbors. Only the manner of that contact varied from county to county, with more neighborhood restaurants and churches in Prince George’s, more intercultural interaction in Montgomery.  Keep reading…

  • Tweaked Rosslyn station on Metro 2030 map

    Jim Hamre of WMATA pointed out that Metro’s current thinking on the separate Blue Line is that it would have to run one block west of the current Rosslyn station, to a new set of platforms connected by an underground walkway. I had hoped that the new tracks could pass right next to the old ones enabling a cross-platform transfer (after all, Rosslyn already has the two tracks on separate…  Keep reading…

  • Peters: promote local control and eschew silos, except on transit and gas taxes

    US Secretary of Transportation Mary Peters spoke at the Brookings Institution today, giving an overview of her thoughts on the future of transportation. Peters has been courageously promoting new ideas, like congestion pricing, that we really need or at least need to thoughtfully consider. Her market-oriented solutions are a potentially revolutionary alternative to the build-more-roads…  Keep reading…

  • What WMATA is really suggesting

    Metrorail is nearing its capacity, with heavy load in many key points throughout the system. At last week’s WMATA board meeting, staff presented recommendations for capital improvements to increase capacity at the bottlenecks. Press outlets covered the topic, but often with confusion on details. WTOP covered the Georgetown/M Street proposal but wrote that the new…  Keep reading…

  • VA wants more rail, needs money

    Virginia communities are vying to get one more daily commuter train to Washington, reports the Post. Amtrak is willing to run another train from Lynchburg to Union Station via Charlottesville, Culpeper and Manassas, or from Newport News via Williamsburg and Richmond. Unfortunately, Virginia only has money for one or the other.  Keep reading…

  • Transit vision roundup

    Track Twenty-Nine has a new transit vision map of potential Metro and light rail expansion for the Washington region. I’ve also uploaded a minor tweak to my light rail and commuter rail map. Here is a quick roundup of all the recent Washington area transit vision maps. These maps and the various lines in them span a wide range of levels of realism, from serious proposal that’s…  Keep reading…

  • R.I.P. Drive ‘Til You Qualify

    House prices are falling fastest in the areas with longest commutes, reports NPR, upsetting the traditional real estate mantra of “drive ‘til you qualify” where homebuyers put up with longer and longer commutes for cheaper housing.  Keep reading…

  • Busy editor, busy trains

    I won’t be able to post much the rest of the week. But here are some links to keep you entertained:  Keep reading…

  • Urban policy forum [won’t] skip transportation

    UPenn Law School is hosting a forum on “Urban Policy and the Presidency” on Thursday with reps from the Obama and Clinton campaigns. They’re discussing important urban policy topics, like economic development, affordable housing, and environmental justice. But, like so many “urban policy” discussions, transportation isn’t on the agenda…  Keep reading…

  • Sleeper train: late night transit links

    Politically difficult, congestion pricing nonetheless is probably a good idea, argues Fred Hiatt of the Washington Post.  Keep reading…

  • Breakfast bites

    Obama, Clinton ride transit but don’t talk about it: Clinton and Obama both have good, though vague, plaforms on transportation policy, writes the Philadelphia Daily News. But transportation hasn’t been an issue in the campaign, while America needs visionary thinking in transportation. One thing’s for sure, but not in the article: McCain is much worse, by…  Keep reading…

  • Nationals play on a weeknight, world still doesn’t end

    Despite some doomsday predictions, the Nationals’ first weeknight game also went smoothly, with Metro again handling the crowds without any significant problems. The parking lots were half empty (though the game wasn’t sold out), and the bike parking got some use despite the rain.  Keep reading…

  • Mid-city renaissance thanks to Metro

    Sunday’s Washington Post has a feature article on the path from burned-out ghetto to high-priced condo in Columbia Heights, Shaw, H Street and other corridors destroyed in the 1968 riots. Suburbanization and desegregation pushed affluent people, black and white, to move out to suburbs, and the riots destroyed the remaining economic fabric. Federal and municipal disinvestment…  Keep reading…

  • Stadium opens without parking, world doesn’t end

    If you are in the DC area and haven’t been living under a rock, you know that DC’s brand-new (and entirely taxpayer-funded) stadium opened last weekend. You also know that the city built remarkably few parking lots, telling fans to take Metro, bike (using the free bike valet) or take a shuttle from parking lots at RFK Stadium.  Keep reading…

  • Alexandria gets a “trolley”

    The first time I went to Old Town Alexandria, I thought, “there needs to be a trolley along King Street from the Metro to the waterfront.” Well, now there is. Sorta. It’s really a bus dressed up as a trolley, which DC Metrocentric sneers at but I think has merit: a dinging trolley probably would be more appealing to visitors who shop at the high-end boutiques and chain…  Keep reading…

  • BeyondDC’s map

    Continuing the trend of transit expansion maps like mine and Track Twenty-Nine’s, Dan of BeyondDC has a transit vision. He won’t call it a “fantasy map” because this is no fantasy: by building only half the Silver Line and using the money for more streetcars, the construction cost ought to be little more than what has been seriously proposed in recent years.  Keep reading…

  • Waiting for the L2

    The L2 bus travels along Connecticut Avenue from Friendship Heights, detours through Adams Morgan, down 18th and New Hampshire through Dupont, and then along K Street to McPherson Square. It also runs right past my window. I started keeping track of its actual times and compared them to the schedule. (Click for a bigger version). This chart shows how much time you are likely…  Keep reading…

  • Post streetcar map

    The Post has a good map of proposed streetcar and BRT routes, modeled off the ones from DDOT and others that I use in my map. Via Richard Layman.  Keep reading…

  • A 21st-century Eisenhower

    President Eisenhower’s most lasting achievement is either the term “military-  Keep reading…

  • Transportation Commission report dissected

    Rob Goodspeed ordered a copy of the mammoth National Surface Transportation Policy and Revenue Study Commission report—the one with which DOT Secretary Mary Peters disagreed and from which some Administration officials removed parts. Rob has a detailed yet clear analysis of the report’s key recommendations.  Keep reading…

Browse by month

You can help keep independent, thoughtful, policy-oriented reporting and analysis healthy by supporting us with a monthly, yearly, or one-time contribution.

Support Us