Posts about TransitRSS

  • Proposed Metro expansion in 2001

    In 2001, WMATA proposed a set of expansions for the overburdened system.   Keep reading…

  • Richardson supports light rail

    New Mexico governor and Presidential candidate Bill Richardson is a strong supporter of light rail, according to the AP. In a speech made in Los Angeles, Richardson promised to “make it a major effort to refocus transportation construction of roads into light rail and more energy efficient transportation,” and to “make light rail at least an equal partner”…  Keep reading…

  • Even Beverly Hills wants a subway

    That’s a headline you were very unlikely to see twenty, ten, or even five years ago, but things have changed.  The LA Times is reporting that city officials are working to make sure that a subway through the Westside includes stops in Beverly Hills.  “‘There is an incredible sea change of attitude from resistance to support for the subway,’ said…  Keep reading…

  • Three Bay Area transit plans

    As the car-dependent San Francisco Bay Area continues to gradually make itself more transit-friendly, the idea of building less car-dependent housing, even in less central areas, continues to attract at least some adherents.  Here are three plans in varying stages of realism.  Keep reading…

  • NYC BRT

    On Thursday, I was in the vicinity of 10th Avenue and 23rd Street, heading home.  Since 10th Avenue turns into Amsterdam and I live half a block from Amsterdam, I decided to try taking the M11 bus.  I knew traffic would be bad, and wasn’t in a rush, but getting past the Lincoln Tunnel was horrifically slow.  Keep reading…

  • Restoring Penn Station: Possible?

    In the 1960s, the beautiful Penn Station was torn down and replaced by the hideous Madison Square Garden, relegating America’s busiest train station to a cramped basement.  Now, New York is poised to build a new grand Moynihan Station on the west side of 8th Avenue, in the old Farley Post Office building that happens to have been designed by the same architects.  No…  Keep reading…

  • More than a thousand words

    None but the most corrupt of politicians would think that moving Yankee Stadium over to a public park, farther from the highway, replacing that park with some space on top of garages and other parkland crammed up against the river far away from the neighborhood, and having the city kick in $70 million for this, could possibly be a good idea.  Keep reading…

  • WMATA expansion plans

    New York City’s subway first opened in 1904, and Boston’s in 1908; but by the 1960s, Washington DC still had no subway system.  A comprehensive plan designed at that time has by now been built, with a few changes.  Therefore, WMATA has developed a new master plan to keep systems in good repair, extend trains to eight cars, make pedestrian access improvements,…  Keep reading…

  • Westwood Station

    In Westwood, MA is the Route 128 rail station, a stop on Amtrak’s Acela and Regional trains between Boston and the rest of the Northeast Corridor cities to the south.  It is also a stop on the MBTA’s commuter rail, and immediately off Massachusetts’ Route 128, (in that area at least) better know to the rest of the country as I-95.  Keep reading…

  • Build This California!

    San Francisco is one of California’s few dense, walkable cities.  Many San Francisco residents do not own cars and get around on a daily basis using public transportation.  Keep reading…

  • City Council takes some stupid pills

    It’s the most basic rule of economics - if something costs more, people will do it less, and vice versa.    Keep reading…

  • Purple Line

    In the DC area, more jobs are continuing to move to the suburban areas outside the city.  The way the regional authorities handle this growth will have a great deal of influence on whether the growth leads to more walkable, transit-oriented communities or to more sprawl.  Keep reading…

  • Harvard’s Allston plan: wow

    The architects hired by Harvard University to study locating facilities in Allston have created an interim report, and it’s really nice.  If Harvard really implements most of it, rather than getting cheap and cutting the more expensive pieces which improve quality of life, it sounds as though a really nice new campus might result.  I’m pleasantly surprised,…  Keep reading…

  • Go go gadget transportation!

    I just got off the NJ Transit bus #126 coming home from Drinking Liberally.  Coming back after a late night at Rudy’s was never so painless.  I knew a bus left at 12:55 (after midnight they’re every 30 minutes), so I walked out at 12:45, made it to the bus a few minutes before departure, and was already home by 1:15.  Compare this to walking all the way to 7th…  Keep reading…

  • The sprawl lovers

    There’s something aesthetically appealing about big, soaring highway ramps conveying a feeling of speed and mobility.  And I can understand why, in Robert Moses’ day, people could have thought building highways was a grand endeavor.  But we now know they just don’t work.  Or do we?  Alex Marshall, author of one of the best books on sprawl,…  Keep reading…

  • Let’s solve traffic jams by creating more!

    Congress is close to approving a huge transportation bill, which in its original form allocated $300 billion to roads but only $75 billion to transit.  According to the article, “House Transportation Committee spokeman Steve Hansen… cited the $70 billion that is ‘wasted each year due solely to traffic congestion and the waste of more than 5.7 billion gallons…  Keep reading…

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