Posts about TransitRSS

  • Sci-fi coast to coast high speed rail network

    Imagine that long-distance, very high speed rail lines (airplane speeds or better) were practical and relatively cheap to build. What might the resulting transit-like intercity service look like? Working on the recent DC fantasy maps reminded me of this map which I created years ago. Here it is, dusted off for your pleasure. Click on the map for a larger version. More…  Keep reading…

  • Strike two for NoVa transit

    The Post’s Get There has a list of the transportation projects in jeopardy now that the Virginia Supreme Court struck down the law authorizing the Northern Virginia Transportation Authority. Between an anti-transit USDOT and a largely anti-transit state legislature, it’s tough to be Northern Virginia.  Keep reading…

  • “There is not going to be a Quaker Oats Metro station”

    Councilmember Jim Graham (rightly) put to rest speculation that DC may rename the Navy Yard Metro station after the corporate sponsor who buys naming rights to the new ballpark. Meanwhile, New York announced plans to rename every station on the 4 and D trains after corporations with all the money going to the Yankees. OK, they didn’t, but if Hank Steinbrenner were to hang out…  Keep reading…

  • Metro adopts “common sense writ large”

    WMATA will now encourage transit-oriented development on its land around Metro stations, instead of just selling it for the money and ignoring land use. By encouraging mixed-use development, it will create more future riders, which is better for Metro and the region. Via Matthew Yglesias (and welcome, Yglesias readers!)…  Keep reading…

  • Another regional rail plan

    Inspired by the recent spate of transit plans from here and other blogs, Track Twenty-Nine has a Regional Rail plan that includes a tunnel through downtown so commuters can directly access the job centers around Metro Center and Farragut.  Keep reading…

  • Rat-filled subway vs. Fisher-Price subway

    Was the DC Metro trash talking New York City? NYT’s City Room thinks so and does some trash talking of its own back. But I’m not going to disagree that the WMATA map could use some more “sophistication”.  Keep reading…

  • Greater Baltimore & Washington Transit Future version 2

    This map shows what the transportation system of the Baltimore-Washington area would look like if most of the proposed improvements are built. In particular, it includes the Silver Line to Dulles; several new infill Metro stations; turning MARC and VRE into transit-like service with frequent trains that run through from Maryland to Virginia so all commuters can reach Union Station,…  Keep reading…

  • SF moving forward with Central Subway

    San Francisco just selected an alignment for the Central Subway, a tunnel for the new T-Third light rail line that will run up Fourth Street to Stockton, connecting the China Basin/ballpark/Caltrain area to downtown and Chinatown. Transbay Blog isn’t so sure this is worth the money and thinks there may be better ways.  Keep reading…

  • Greater Washington Transit Future: a multimodal fantasy map

    Update: Version 2 is now available. Dan at BeyondDC was one of several people to comment that Metrorail is not the most cost-effective way to provide transit. In fact, it’s pretty darn cost-ineffective. So while it’s fun to dream about Metro lines everywhere, what’s a more achievable transit vision? There are two areas officials want to improve transit,…  Keep reading…

  • Even more fantastic WMATA fantasy map

    Based on suggestions from Richard Layman and others, I’ve added to the fantasy map to create an even fantasy-er map (as before, click for big version): There’s fantasy, and then there’s even more fantasy. In the world of today, a lot of these lines are probably more cost-effectively served by light rail, streetcars, BRT, or something else. They’re…  Keep reading…

  • WMATA fantasy combo map

    Many proposals are floating around for Metro expansion. Some have been thoroughly researched by government and are just waiting for funding, like the Dulles extension. Others are just suggestions from activists and bloggers. Many are somewhere in between. To show the ideas in one place, I’ve created this fantasy map. Click on the map for a large version, and see below…  Keep reading…

  • Digging the parking hole deeper

    The Washington area is deeply schizophrenic about whether it wants to be a city of driving and parking or of people and transit. While DC is working hard to put mixed-use high-density development next to many of its stations, plans in Foggy Bottom and West Hyattsville call for more parking than should be necessary. Whether a city is car-dependent or transit-accessible is…  Keep reading…

  • New Partners: Frustrating Transit Administrators

    I jumped in to a panel on streetcars fairly late. It featured people from Portland, Tuscon, and other cities that have recently deployed streetcars. When I came in, they were expressing major frustration with the FTA and its decisionmaking.  Keep reading…

  • New Partners: Congestion pricing and transportation finance

    The panel at the New Partners conference on transportation finance featured NYC’s congestion pricing hero Bruce Schaller, and Michael Replogle of Environmental Defense. As David Burwell of Project for Public Spaces said when he introduced the panel: The transportation trust fund is broke—not just broken, but broke. Actually, the highway fund is broke now, and the…  Keep reading…

  • Maryland worried about new transit-hostile FTA

    According to the Post, Maryland officials are nervous that the Federal (not-so-excited-about-)Transit Administration will reject the Purple Line or the Corridor Cities Transitway (along I-270) as it did (or at least delayed) the Silver Line to Dulles, even though the Purple Line will cost significantly less. Maryland already delayed the Purple Line application process one…  Keep reading…

  • New Partners: Earl Blumenauer and Mary Landrieu

    Senator Mary Landrieu of Louisiana and Congressman Earl Blumenauer of Oregon, whose district includes Portland, joined in a roundtable discussion. Blumenauer had strong words for the Bush Administration on its transportation policy, especially the recent commission report, where language in favor of increasing the gas tax was cut out. Blumenauer: the commission was set…  Keep reading…

  • Rockville Pike meeting only gives driving directions

    Rockville’s planning department is soliciting community input on improving Rockville Pike along the corridor from Twinbrook to downtown Rockville. The project’s goals include improving transportation and urban design along the Pike.  Keep reading…

  • Alexandria wants new Metro stations

    Members of the Alexandria City Council want developers to contribute to new Metro stations as part of potential new developments in Potomac Yards (between National Airport and Old Town Alexandria) and Eisenhower Valley (where the Blue Line goes west from Old Town to Van Dorn Street). Via Ryan Avent.  Keep reading…

  • Three projects to watch

    All over the region, consulting organizations are going through the legal requirements for Environmental Impact Statements, necessary for any major project: convening public scoping meetings, collecting input, evaluating alternatives, and so on. They’re doing this in downtown Columbia, along Rockville Pike, and on both sides of the 14th Street Bridges, used by I-395,…  Keep reading…

  • Conservative won’t vote for McCain partly because of rail

    Paul Weyrich, the leading conservative proponent of rail transportation, wouldn’t vote for John McCain in the general election in part because of McCain’s opposition to rail investment. McCain “would fight us on everything,” Weyrich said, including shutting down Amtrak and opposing projects like the Dulles extension, where he vehemently disagrees…  Keep reading…

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