Posts about ParkingRSS

  • Smart transportation policy from Tommy Wells

    Councilmember Tommy Wells (Ward 6, which includes Capitol Hill, Penn Quarter, and Southwest Waterfront) has not only been reading his Donald Shoup but his Streetsblog as well. His Web site bears the slogan, “for a livable and walkable community.” And he’s been pushing policies that indeed enhance livable communities.  Keep reading…

  • DC keeps getting blank walls

    Two new developments in Washington, DC continue the disappointing trend of creating buildings that present blank walls to the street. Just as New York did in the 1970s and sometimes still does, and just like much of today’s downtown DC, developers create fortress-like apartment buildings, offices, and even churches that isolate their residents from the neighborhood…  Keep reading…

  • UFT disappoints on parking

    Randi Weingarten, president of NYC’s United Federation of Teachers, acted against the public interest by defending parking placards for teachers, as just another type of benefit and digging in her heels to protect the status quo. Unions are a controversial part of our society and economy. Years of conservative framing have made many citizens deeply suspicious of unions,…  Keep reading…

  • Picking on planners

    I’m reading two books about urban planning, Donald Shoup’s groundbreaking work on parking policy The High Cost of Free Parking, and Cato Institute planning critic Randal O’Toole’s The Best-Laid Plans: How Government Planning Harms Your Quality of Life, Your Pocketbook, and Your Future whose agenda is apparent from its title.  Keep reading…

  • “All I want for New Year’s is free parking”

    When asked what they wished for in the New Year, many neighborhood leaders replied world peace, better public schools, and free parking. Free parking? Yes, Cleveland Park ANC Commissioner Richard Rothblum listed those very items (fortunately, in that order). In the latest Dupont Current (which unfortunately has no online archives except June 2007), a variety of neighborhood…  Keep reading…

  • NYC will crack down on placard abuse

    A year-long campaign by TA and other livable streets activists has paid off in a very short time: the Bloomberg Administration (which, lately, has been very good on transportation issues not involving the Yankees), is restricting the number of parking placards and stepping up enforcement.  Keep reading…

  • Can NYC build me a personal garage too?

    As even more lurid details emerge of New York’s $340 million giveaway for Yankees parking—that’s right, entirely for parking—we learn that 70 million will go entirely to build a free garage reserved for Yankees and their guests, with no revenue ever being collected to pay back the city; that the total amount the team is paying the city for rent will decrease;…  Keep reading…

  • DC may experiment with market pricing for parking

    DC Councilmember Tommy Wells apparently has been reading his Donald Shoup. New York livable-streets activists have been calling for parking pricing reform for some time, following the teachings of groundbreaking parking scholar Shoup. Slowly, NYC leaders are starting to come around to this idea. But when they arrive, they may find DC already there waiting for them.  Keep reading…

  • Soho shoppers seek sidewalk space

    I’ve written before that SoHo streets could be enormously improved if we simply took away some parking (accommodating about 6 people per block) in favor of larger sidewalks (accommodating hundreds of people per hour per block).  Keep reading…

  • Closing the bowtie

    Times Square is one of the most crowded pedestrian areas in the city.  As I covered over a year ago, the Times Square Alliance, the local business association, suggested closing the cutover between Seventh Avenue and Broadway - the “bowtie”, to create additional pedestrian space between the two avenues. …  Keep reading…

  • Save Our Superblock

    One of the travesties of 1950s-era urban planning was the “superblock”, where cities disrupted the regular street grid to build large towers surrounded by windswept plazas.  Most of these superblocks are now recognized as mistakes, such as Boston’s City Hall Plaza, a huge barren space nearly empty all year round, and the World Trade Center superblock,…  Keep reading…

  • Low rent for metal tenants

    I pay approximately $4.36 per square foot per month for my apartment.  But to park my car right outside, if I comply with alternate side parking rules, costs zero.    Keep reading…

  • Congestion pricing, pro and incoherent

    Enjoying a new spate of publicity, the idea of congestion pricing rated a pair of columns, pro and con, in the Daily News.  The pro article, by Paul White of Transportation Alternatives, laid out some clear arguments backed up by facts: London’s pilot program reduced traffic 18% and sped up travel by 30%, in addition to generating revenue for mass transit projects.  Keep reading…

  • News flash: people drive more if there is parking

    A study from San Francisco State shows something that should be obvious, but isn’t to the New York City Council: if there are fewer parking spaces, people choose to drive less.  Therefore, San Francisco should limit the amount of parking in new developments, rather than requiring a certain amount as it does today. More about free parking, and its costs, in this SF Chronicle editorial.  Keep reading…

  • City Council takes some stupid pills

    It’s the most basic rule of economics - if something costs more, people will do it less, and vice versa.    Keep reading…

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