Posts about ParkingRSS

  • Consensus and controversy in Rockville’s Pike

    Last night I attended a community meeting in Rockville about “envisioning a great place” for Rockville Pike, specifically the segment from Twinbrook Parkway to Richard Montgomery Drive (just north of Wootton Parkway). This section is almost entirely filled with strip malls behind large parking lots—the cookie-cutter suburban retail that makes Rockville’s…  Keep reading…

  • Parking reformers have some educatin’ to do

    Image by emily geoff on FlickrWhen Jane Jacobs wrote The Death and Life of Great American Cities in 1961, almost everyone from planners to the public believed in freeway construction, single-use zoning, and urban renewal projects. Today, you’re not going to see a lot of people commenting on a blog like DCist arguing that we should run a freeway between Dupont Circle and Adams…  Keep reading…

  • Nelson\\Nygaard parking presentation

    Here’s the presentation on parking policy given by Jason Schrieber of Nelson\\Nygaard here in DC a few weeks ago. Thanks to Gwen of Cleveland Park for posting it.  Keep reading…

  • A better 14th Street coming soon

    Last week was the latest public meeting to review the proposed streetscape improvements to 14th Street, from Florida Avenue to Thomas Circle. I wasn’t able to make the meeting, which conflicted with the Columbia Heights parking meeting, but I was able to get copies of the presentation. This street is becoming a major restaurant and bar corridor, and improvements that make…  Keep reading…

  • NIMBYism strong on Upper Wisconsin

    Calling it “giving up on Smart Growth,” Marc Fisher laments the death of a development proposal at the Tenleytown Metro, which would have replaced a small neighborhood library with higher density mixed-use and moved the library a few blocks away. The first time I went to Tenleytown, visiting friends who live there, we had to walk about 15 minutes to Connecticut Avenue…  Keep reading…

  • Performance parking coming to Columbia Heights

    In Columbia Heights, only 25% of residents own cars. With a Metro station and numerous bus lines, bike lanes and Zipcars, it’s a neighborhood conducive to car non-ownership. But if you were at the public meeting on Tuesday night to discuss proposed changes to parking policy, you might think that 75% of residents drive every day, and the other 25% work for smart growth or bicycle…  Keep reading…

  • Is the 1,000 space garage in Columbia Heights a good investment?

    The DC USA project in Columbia Heights will open this spring, bringing a Target and many other national chains to DC (many for their first store in DC) in 600,000 square feet of retail along with 1,300 new apartments. It will also bring traffic. There are two main ways to deal with this: provide more parking spaces, and/or use parking management techniques to encourage as many people…  Keep reading…

  • I may have been too hard on Richard Rothblum

    I mocked Cleveland Park ANC commissioner Richard Rothblum who made free parking one of his top New Year’s wishes. Over on the Cleveland Park list, the parking discussion has taken a sensible turn, as all the people who want more free parking for themselves and more restrictions for everyone else have given way to some basic economic sense, including from Richard Rothblum. One…  Keep reading…

  • Ward 3 parking vision

    The Ward 3 Vision community group, which is affiliated with the Coalition for Smarter Growth, has a page up about parking management in residential areas, including flyers and powerpoints about the issue. This is in response to the ongoing debate over visitor passes in Cleveland Park.  Keep reading…

  • Popular parking at the Poplar park?

    Council Chairman Vincent Gray is suggesting that any parking built on Poplar Point for a soccer stadium could be used for baseball games at other times. It’s not a bad idea, as long as the parking is charged at market rate. On the other hand, I wonder how needed it will be—if the ballpark can get by for a few years without Poplar, people will already be used to taking Metro, and…  Keep reading…

  • NYC discusses blank walls

    Streetsblog spoke with New York’s Department of City Planning about the new blank wall buildings going up on Brooklyn’s Fourth Avenue, which Streetsblog and I criticized. DCP explained why they didn’t require retail, and how the minimum parking requirements forced garages onto these buildings.  Keep reading…

  • Cleveland Park(ing) puzzles, part 2

    The email discussion on Cleveland Park’s list continues over whether to give residents free visitor parking passes, which they can give to out of town guests, nannies, contractors, or possibly sell to commuters, to park for free. Quite simply, the demand for parking outstrips the supply. There is demand to park on neighborhood streets from residents, guests, domestic…  Keep reading…

  • Cleveland Park(ing) puzzles

    Photo by KCIveyCleveland Park, the neighborhood whose ANC commissioner prioritized more free parking right after world peace on his New Year’s wish list, is abuzz once more about parking on their email list, DC’s most prolific neighborhood list. This time, it’s over a DDOT proposal to give residents visitor parking passes, like they are doing in Ward 4. Some…  Keep reading…

  • Less parking at 14th and U would solve many problems

    At Wednesday’s Dupont Circle ANC meeting, architect Eric Colbert presented revised plans for the 14th and U development proposal. The ANC still wants to make it smaller, but beyond the classic fight over density, this project is a perfect example of the silly and detrimental effects of minimum parking requirements. Current zoning requires one space per two units for…  Keep reading…

  • Lauriol Parking Improvement District?

    I live a block from Lauriol Plaza, a Mexican restaurant popular for its large size, drinks, and outdoor and roof seating. On weekend evenings, parking is very scarce as scores of people drive to Lauriol and circle around and around the neighborhood streets in search of parking. This is a great opportunity to try creative parking policy like a Parking Improvement District. If we…  Keep reading…

  • Parking isn’t a good reason to move the Rockville courthouse

    The Montgomery County courthouse, in the county seat of Rockville, is old and badly needs replacing. Maryland is ready to pay for a new courthouse on a downtown site formerly occupied by the library, but some people want to move it. There are good arguments for moving it and for not moving it. There are also some very bad arguments. In particular, many who advocate changing the location…  Keep reading…

  • Digging the parking hole deeper

    The Washington area is deeply schizophrenic about whether it wants to be a city of driving and parking or of people and transit. While DC is working hard to put mixed-use high-density development next to many of its stations, plans in Foggy Bottom and West Hyattsville call for more parking than should be necessary. Whether a city is car-dependent or transit-accessible is…  Keep reading…

  • The passion of parking policy

    A roomful of people gave two hours of their evening last night to attend a panel sponsored by the Coalition for Smarter Growth at the Downtown BID about parking policy. Many joked privately beforehand that parking is quite a boring-sounding topic to generate such fascination, including Councilmember Tommy Wells, who spoke at the beginning. He came up with the slogan of “walkable,…  Keep reading…

  • LA: smart move on parking, dumb move on roads

    Today on Street Heat LA, the LA DOT took a knee-jerk position around moving cars smoothly at the expense of pedestrians when it insisted that the LA County Museum of Art remove a traffic light and crosswalk across Wilshire in front of its entrance and actually fill in the median to prevent people from crossing the street. On the other hand, the LA City Council is pushing for greater compliance…  Keep reading…

  • Three projects to watch

    All over the region, consulting organizations are going through the legal requirements for Environmental Impact Statements, necessary for any major project: convening public scoping meetings, collecting input, evaluating alternatives, and so on. They’re doing this in downtown Columbia, along Rockville Pike, and on both sides of the 14th Street Bridges, used by I-395,…  Keep reading…

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