Posts about ParkingRSS

  • Cleveland Park(ing) puzzles, part 2

    The email discussion on Cleveland Park’s list continues over whether to give residents free visitor parking passes, which they can give to out of town guests, nannies, contractors, or possibly sell to commuters, to park for free. Quite simply, the demand for parking outstrips the supply. There is demand to park on neighborhood streets from residents, guests, domestic…  Keep reading…

  • Cleveland Park(ing) puzzles

    Photo by KCIveyCleveland Park, the neighborhood whose ANC commissioner prioritized more free parking right after world peace on his New Year’s wish list, is abuzz once more about parking on their email list, DC’s most prolific neighborhood list. This time, it’s over a DDOT proposal to give residents visitor parking passes, like they are doing in Ward 4. Some…  Keep reading…

  • Less parking at 14th and U would solve many problems

    At Wednesday’s Dupont Circle ANC meeting, architect Eric Colbert presented revised plans for the 14th and U development proposal. The ANC still wants to make it smaller, but beyond the classic fight over density, this project is a perfect example of the silly and detrimental effects of minimum parking requirements. Current zoning requires one space per two units for…  Keep reading…

  • Lauriol Parking Improvement District?

    I live a block from Lauriol Plaza, a Mexican restaurant popular for its large size, drinks, and outdoor and roof seating. On weekend evenings, parking is very scarce as scores of people drive to Lauriol and circle around and around the neighborhood streets in search of parking. This is a great opportunity to try creative parking policy like a Parking Improvement District. If we…  Keep reading…

  • Parking isn’t a good reason to move the Rockville courthouse

    The Montgomery County courthouse, in the county seat of Rockville, is old and badly needs replacing. Maryland is ready to pay for a new courthouse on a downtown site formerly occupied by the library, but some people want to move it. There are good arguments for moving it and for not moving it. There are also some very bad arguments. In particular, many who advocate changing the location…  Keep reading…

  • Digging the parking hole deeper

    The Washington area is deeply schizophrenic about whether it wants to be a city of driving and parking or of people and transit. While DC is working hard to put mixed-use high-density development next to many of its stations, plans in Foggy Bottom and West Hyattsville call for more parking than should be necessary. Whether a city is car-dependent or transit-accessible is…  Keep reading…

  • The passion of parking policy

    A roomful of people gave two hours of their evening last night to attend a panel sponsored by the Coalition for Smarter Growth at the Downtown BID about parking policy. Many joked privately beforehand that parking is quite a boring-sounding topic to generate such fascination, including Councilmember Tommy Wells, who spoke at the beginning. He came up with the slogan of “walkable,…  Keep reading…

  • LA: smart move on parking, dumb move on roads

    Today on Street Heat LA, the LA DOT took a knee-jerk position around moving cars smoothly at the expense of pedestrians when it insisted that the LA County Museum of Art remove a traffic light and crosswalk across Wilshire in front of its entrance and actually fill in the median to prevent people from crossing the street. On the other hand, the LA City Council is pushing for greater compliance…  Keep reading…

  • Three projects to watch

    All over the region, consulting organizations are going through the legal requirements for Environmental Impact Statements, necessary for any major project: convening public scoping meetings, collecting input, evaluating alternatives, and so on. They’re doing this in downtown Columbia, along Rockville Pike, and on both sides of the 14th Street Bridges, used by I-395,…  Keep reading…

  • DC Council hearing on “Performance Parking” plan

    JDLand has a summary of the hearing around Tommy Wells’ plan to use market-pricing techniques to discourage parking around the new baseball stadium. From JD’s summary, the hearing didn’t turn out to be that interesting, with most speakers in favor of the plan and little new ground covered.  Keep reading…

  • Monday morning links

    San Francisco is considering a bill to reform parking requirements, removing the requirements forcing developers to build parking in certain types of housing developments, “unbundling” parking so condo purchasers can choose whether to pay for a parking space or not, and allowing mechanical or valet parking to save space if the building wants it.  Keep reading…

  • “I’m all for bike lanes but” not enough room to double park

    Today’s Gridlock Sam column in the NY Daily News contains this letter that reveals the amazing absurdity of New York’s parking mess. This truck driver depends on double parking to make deliveries, but new bike lanes interfere with space for the double parking. Does he criticize the lack of loading zones? No, it’s clearly the bike lanes at fault. And rather…  Keep reading…

  • UFT still narrow-minded on parking

    Sam Schwartz, former NYC Traffic Commissioner who reduced placard parking in the 1980s, released his ten-part recommendation for reducing placard abuse. But the UFT has other ideas, passing a resolution asking for expanded rights to park on their schools’ scarce property.   Keep reading…

  • Preservation “incompatible” with historic preservation

    There is a lot of bad blood between the Dupont Circle ANC and the HPRB. Even before the Third Church issue, there were several other deeply felt conflicts, which led to serious discussion at this month’s ANC meeting about a “historic preservation bill of rights” limiting, in some ways, HPRB’s authority. Some ANC commissioners argued that HPRB is inconsistent…  Keep reading…

  • Smart transportation policy from Tommy Wells

    Councilmember Tommy Wells (Ward 6, which includes Capitol Hill, Penn Quarter, and Southwest Waterfront) has not only been reading his Donald Shoup but his Streetsblog as well. His Web site bears the slogan, “for a livable and walkable community.” And he’s been pushing policies that indeed enhance livable communities.  Keep reading…

  • DC keeps getting blank walls

    Two new developments in Washington, DC continue the disappointing trend of creating buildings that present blank walls to the street. Just as New York did in the 1970s and sometimes still does, and just like much of today’s downtown DC, developers create fortress-like apartment buildings, offices, and even churches that isolate their residents from the neighborhood…  Keep reading…

  • UFT disappoints on parking

    Randi Weingarten, president of NYC’s United Federation of Teachers, acted against the public interest by defending parking placards for teachers, as just another type of benefit and digging in her heels to protect the status quo. Unions are a controversial part of our society and economy. Years of conservative framing have made many citizens deeply suspicious of unions,…  Keep reading…

  • Picking on planners

    I’m reading two books about urban planning, Donald Shoup’s groundbreaking work on parking policy The High Cost of Free Parking, and Cato Institute planning critic Randal O’Toole’s The Best-Laid Plans: How Government Planning Harms Your Quality of Life, Your Pocketbook, and Your Future whose agenda is apparent from its title.  Keep reading…

  • “All I want for New Year’s is free parking”

    When asked what they wished for in the New Year, many neighborhood leaders replied world peace, better public schools, and free parking. Free parking? Yes, Cleveland Park ANC Commissioner Richard Rothblum listed those very items (fortunately, in that order). In the latest Dupont Current (which unfortunately has no online archives except June 2007), a variety of neighborhood…  Keep reading…

  • NYC will crack down on placard abuse

    A year-long campaign by TA and other livable streets activists has paid off in a very short time: the Bloomberg Administration (which, lately, has been very good on transportation issues not involving the Yankees), is restricting the number of parking placards and stepping up enforcement.  Keep reading…

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