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  • Get involved this week in PG Co., Arlington, DC

    It’s the first week of the month and that means lots and lots of great opportunities to speak up in local government!  Keep reading…

  • Klingle: Even more cars in Rock Creek?

    San Francisco has the Embarcadero Freeway. New York has the West Side Highway. In both cases, nature forced the city to close a road which it would   never have had the political fortitude to do otherwise. In both cases, residents realized they didn’t really need the road after all.  Keep reading…

  • “Bike Rack Raising” 11 am at DC USA

    Responding to the surprising lack of bike racks at the new Target, WABA found some unused racks at RFK Stadium and DDOT has agreed to move them. WABA is organizing a public “bike rack raising” at 11 am today (Friday, March 14) to help install the racks and “highlight the lack of amenities for cyclists at the new development.”…  Keep reading…

  • Bike parking scarce at DC USA

    Friends and Smarter Growthers tell me that the new Target in Columbia Heights has been a rousing success, except for the bike situation. According to reports, there were bicycles locked up all over the place this weekend because, when spending $42 million for a parking garage, our government didn’t build enough bike parking.  Keep reading…

  • The Complete Streets Act

    Senator Tom Harkin of Iowa introduced a Complete Streets Act to push cities and towns to design their streets for people, bicyclists, and traffic all together. Streetsblog is cautiously pleased but sees “Hummer-sized loopholes”. Here’s Smart Growth America’s analysis (they’re strongly for it.)…  Keep reading…

  • Google Maps: Bike There

    There’s a site with a petition for Google Maps to add a “bike there” option showing directions by bike, including bike lanes. Great idea, though the obstacle to Bike There is finding bike lane data. While we’re at it, how about just a “walk there”?   Keep reading…

  • Fire Mary Peters

    The Teamsters have a campaign going to fire US DOT Secretary Mary Peters for continuing a program that lets Mexican trucks haul freight in the US with lower safety standards. It’s a good cause, but it’s not the only reason Mary Peters ought to be fired—there’s her dislike for bike paths, unenthusiasm for transit, and opposition to gas tax increases are all…  Keep reading…

  • A better 14th Street coming soon

    Last week was the latest public meeting to review the proposed streetscape improvements to 14th Street, from Florida Avenue to Thomas Circle. I wasn’t able to make the meeting, which conflicted with the Columbia Heights parking meeting, but I was able to get copies of the presentation. This street is becoming a major restaurant and bar corridor, and improvements that make…  Keep reading…

  • South Capitol: L’Enfant strikes back

    From the South Capitol EIS:As a primary corridor in L’Enfant’s 1791 Plan for the City of Washington, South Capitol Street was envisioned as one of the symbolic gateways to the city and its Monumental Core. ... Today, South Capitol Street lacks any characteristics of its historic and intended function as a gateway. ... South Capitol Street is an urban freeway that has…  Keep reading…

  • Is The Yards waterfront park bike-friendly?

    At the panel on Southeast Federal Center, I asked Pat Daniels of GSA and Ramsey Meiser of Forest City about the bike design for the park, which appears to cram bikers, rollerbladers, runners and others into a narrow sharply-anged pathway at the edge of the park. Meiser and Daniels were confident that the park was going to be bike-friendly, though they couldn’t respond specifically…  Keep reading…

  • Three projects to watch

    All over the region, consulting organizations are going through the legal requirements for Environmental Impact Statements, necessary for any major project: convening public scoping meetings, collecting input, evaluating alternatives, and so on. They’re doing this in downtown Columbia, along Rockville Pike, and on both sides of the 14th Street Bridges, used by I-395,…  Keep reading…

  • The Yards waterfront park squeezes bikes to the edge

    NCPC has preliminary plans online for a new watefront park at The Yards, a new development next to the Navy Yard in Southeast. The park has many very nice features including a large terraced lawn, a landscaped garden, and a cool-looking pedestrian bridge (though one NCPC staff recommends be made to look more open, light and inviting). But the designers seem to have forgotten about bikers,…  Keep reading…

  • Presidential candidates on transit, cycling and walking

    Streetsblog’s LA correspondent Damien Newton researched the Presidential candidates’ positions on transportation. For the Democrats, both Obama’s and Clinton’s platforms hold a great deal of promise. Obama is the most pro-cycling candidate, extols the virtues of walking, and supported Chicago’s transit system while in the Illinois legislature,…  Keep reading…

  • Get off the road! No, get on the road!

    At dinner the other day, some friends expressed surprise that DC law allows riding a bicycle on the sidewalk (except in the central business district, basically between Massachusetts Avenue and the Mall). One person commented that when she is walking, bikes seem to be in the way on the sidewalk, but when she is biking, it’s the people who seem to be in the way. It’s the natural…  Keep reading…

  • “I’m all for bike lanes but” not enough room to double park

    Today’s Gridlock Sam column in the NY Daily News contains this letter that reveals the amazing absurdity of New York’s parking mess. This truck driver depends on double parking to make deliveries, but new bike lanes interfere with space for the double parking. Does he criticize the lack of loading zones? No, it’s clearly the bike lanes at fault. And rather…  Keep reading…

  • Are protected bike lanes actually more dangerous?

    New York has its first physically separated bike lane on 9th Avenue, where the parked cars sit between the bike land and traffic, protecting riders. I emailed DDOT’s Chris Ziemann about the 15th Street reconfiguration, suggesting a similar lane there. Ziemann responded that “separating the bikes from traffic is safer for bikes along the block, but much more dangerous…  Keep reading…

  • Cars vs. bikes

    In a five-part series in the LA Times, Los Angeles blogger and bike user Will Campbell and Cato anti-Smart Growth commentator Randal O’Toole debate the sources of car/bike rage, whether funding bike paths is worthwhile, Critical Mass, and more.  Keep reading…

  • DDOT may restore two-way traffic on 15th Street

    NYC DOT has been on a tear recently converting some excessively wide, one-way neighborhood streets like Carlton Ave in Fort Greene and 9th Street in Park Slope into two-way streets with medians and bike lanes that balance the needs of cars, pedestrians, and bicyclists. DC has some of these too, like 15th Street NW, a four-lane (plus parking) high-speed road that’s about…  Keep reading…

  • Smart transportation policy from Tommy Wells

    Councilmember Tommy Wells (Ward 6, which includes Capitol Hill, Penn Quarter, and Southwest Waterfront) has not only been reading his Donald Shoup but his Streetsblog as well. His Web site bears the slogan, “for a livable and walkable community.” And he’s been pushing policies that indeed enhance livable communities.  Keep reading…

  • Driver vs. pedestrian perspective

    This MPD training presentation makes the excellent point that when driving, you see pedestrians and bicycles as being in the way and violating traffic laws, but while walking or biking, drivers are the ones whose transgressions are visible. (Via TheWashCycle.)  Keep reading…

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