Posts tagged DcRSS

  • Bike parking scarce at DC USA

    Friends and Smarter Growthers tell me that the new Target in Columbia Heights has been a rousing success, except for the bike situation. According to reports, there were bicycles locked up all over the place this weekend because, when spending $42 million for a parking garage, our government didn’t build enough bike parking.  Keep reading…

  • Donatelli builds what investors will fund

    Prince of Petworth interviews Chris Donatelli, developer behind the Ellington on U Street, Highland Park in Columbia Heights, and the upcoming Park Place in Petworth. Many of Donatelli’s decisions have been constrained by what he can and can’t raise money for. This supports Christopher Leinberger’s assertion that the real estate finance market inhibits…  Keep reading…

  • Boulevardize the SE/SW Freeway

    Ballpark and Beyond brings up the on-again, off-again idea of replacing the Southeast-Southwest Freeway with a boulevard. Its hulking form makes people feel unsafe walking from the Capitol South Metro to the ballpark. A wide Virginia Avenue with timed lights wouldn’t be so much worse for drivers and much better for everyone else.  Keep reading…

  • DC versus New York

    New York on baseball: Gave away the only park in a poor neighborhood so the Yankees could build a stadium next to their old one instead of replacing the old one. Spent $400 million in public money on the stadium,   Keep reading…

  • No Office Monoculture Area

    Richard Layman is concerned that NoMA is developing with too much office space and too little residential. Right now, office space is more valuable for developers to build, and with the housing market cooling, that’s not about to change. Layman and Ryan Avent suggest raising the height limit. Extra floors could make it feasible to build a mix instead of all offices. On the other…  Keep reading…

  • Shoupism arrives in DC

    DC is now the latest city and the first major East Coast metropolis to implement performance parking pricing as recommended by the prophet of parking, Professor Donald Shoup. Legislation passed yesterday by the DC Council sets up two performance parking pilot programs, near the ballpark and in Columbia Heights. The bill is really four bills in one: Tommy Wells’ plan for…  Keep reading…

  • NoMA Public Radio, not New Parking-Lot Radio. Nice for Pedestrians Radio?

    NPR is moving its headquarters to NoMA, the area north of Union Station that is experiencing major revitalization. I just hope their new building is better than their old one in terms of engaging the streetscape, and that the old one can be turned into something that, unlike many of the newer buildings around Mt. Vernon Square, presents something other than a blank wall to passing pedestrians.  Keep reading…

  • Do offices revitalize a neighborhood?

    DC’s Department of Housing and Community Development is moving to Anacostia, to a site about eight blocks from the Metro, in an effort to revitalize the area. Richard Layman thought this was a mistake in 2005 when officials suggested moving WMATA headquarters to Anacostia, and argues that the 1986 Reeves Center at 14th and U doesn’t get credit for U Street’s success.  Keep reading…

  • Right on, Harriet Tregoning!

    When I moved to DC, many people asked how I could possibly like DC as much as New York. Certainly DC has a few flaws (we need more transit, for example). But DC is terrific in many ways, and on Smart Growth, the DC government is light years more progressive. Just look at this comment by Harriet Tregoning, DC’s head of planning, last night at the Dupont Circle Citizens Association:We…  Keep reading…

  • Parking review part 3: Forces against fixing parking

    Previously in parking-land, I summarized last week’s parking zoning review meeting wherein the group reached a surprising (to me) level of consensus on when to remove minimums and institute maximums in the parking zoning code. Other than residents who don’t believe we can effectively manage spillover parking, what obstacles remain to a better approach to parking?  Keep reading…

  • “There is not going to be a Quaker Oats Metro station”

    Councilmember Jim Graham (rightly) put to rest speculation that DC may rename the Navy Yard Metro station after the corporate sponsor who buys naming rights to the new ballpark. Meanwhile, New York announced plans to rename every station on the 4 and D trains after corporations with all the money going to the Yankees. OK, they didn’t, but if Hank Steinbrenner were to hang out…  Keep reading…

  • 14th and U project moving forward

    Yesterday, the HPRB approved the general form of the proposed project on the southwest corner of 14th and U. Almost everyone who testified, as well as the HPRB staff and board members, were pleased with the improvements that architect Eric Colbert made to the project since the initial sketches. The rear of the building, away from 14th Street, is 7 stories on the southern end and…  Keep reading…

  • Parking review part 2: But for spillover, we all agree

    In my earlier parking post, I concluded with this key slide from the Nelson\\Nygaard presentation that kicked off the zoning review process (at right). The minimums in the zoning code operate on the premise that since some people will drive and park, we need to provide parking. If we don’t, they’ll park on the street, interfering with residents. Therefore, we must require…  Keep reading…

  • Parking review part 1: Parking choices matter

    Which kind of city do we want DC to be in the future? Left: 27th and O in Georgetown. Right: 7th and O in Shaw. Driving-oriented versus pedestrian-oriented streets. Source: Nelson\\Nygaard presentation Our parking policy decisions decide which city we will be.  Keep reading…

  • Rat-filled subway vs. Fisher-Price subway

    Was the DC Metro trash talking New York City? NYT’s City Room thinks so and does some trash talking of its own back. But I’m not going to disagree that the WMATA map could use some more “sophistication”.  Keep reading…

  • Greater Baltimore & Washington Transit Future version 2

    This map shows what the transportation system of the Baltimore-Washington area would look like if most of the proposed improvements are built. In particular, it includes the Silver Line to Dulles; several new infill Metro stations; turning MARC and VRE into transit-like service with frequent trains that run through from Maryland to Virginia so all commuters can reach Union Station,…  Keep reading…

  • A better 14th Street coming soon

    Last week was the latest public meeting to review the proposed streetscape improvements to 14th Street, from Florida Avenue to Thomas Circle. I wasn’t able to make the meeting, which conflicted with the Columbia Heights parking meeting, but I was able to get copies of the presentation. This street is becoming a major restaurant and bar corridor, and improvements that make…  Keep reading…

  • NIMBYism strong on Upper Wisconsin

    Calling it “giving up on Smart Growth,” Marc Fisher laments the death of a development proposal at the Tenleytown Metro, which would have replaced a small neighborhood library with higher density mixed-use and moved the library a few blocks away. The first time I went to Tenleytown, visiting friends who live there, we had to walk about 15 minutes to Connecticut Avenue…  Keep reading…

  • Performance parking coming to Columbia Heights

    In Columbia Heights, only 25% of residents own cars. With a Metro station and numerous bus lines, bike lanes and Zipcars, it’s a neighborhood conducive to car non-ownership. But if you were at the public meeting on Tuesday night to discuss proposed changes to parking policy, you might think that 75% of residents drive every day, and the other 25% work for smart growth or bicycle…  Keep reading…

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